a lot of love,
a lot of blood




"On the whole I am inclined to think that a witch should not kiss. Perhaps it is the not being kissed that makes her a witch; perhaps the source of her power is the breath of loneliness around her." - Emma Donoghue

S., 24, Italian. Kate is my internet handle and you can call me that. People scare me so I'll probably never talk to you even if I think you're cool, and if I do it'll be very awkward. English is my second language; I apologize for any mistakes.

I love a lot of things, including fairy tales, mythology, ladies who make music, ladies in general, history, languages. I watch a lot of movies and tv, I ship all the things, and I love Pokémon a lot.
 



fairytalemood:

The Sleeper and the Spindle by Neil Gaiman, illustrated by Chris Riddell

A thrillingly reimagined fairy tale from the truly magical combination of author Neil Gaiman and illustrator Chris Riddell – weaving together a sort-of Snow White and an almost Sleeping Beauty with a thread of dark magic, which will hold readers spellbound from start to finish.
On the eve of her wedding, a young queen sets out to rescue a princess from an enchantment. She casts aside her fine wedding clothes, takes her chain mail and her sword and follows her brave dwarf retainers into the tunnels under the mountain towards the sleeping kingdom. This queen will decide her own future – and the princess who needs rescuing is not quite what she seems. Twisting together the familiar and the new, this perfectly delicious, captivating and darkly funny tale shows its creators at the peak of their talents.
Lavishly produced, packed with glorious Chris Riddell illustrations enhanced with metallic ink, this is a spectacular and magical gift.

fairytalemood:

The Sleeper and the Spindle by Neil Gaiman, illustrated by Chris Riddell

A thrillingly reimagined fairy tale from the truly magical combination of author Neil Gaiman and illustrator Chris Riddell – weaving together a sort-of Snow White and an almost Sleeping Beauty with a thread of dark magic, which will hold readers spellbound from start to finish.

On the eve of her wedding, a young queen sets out to rescue a princess from an enchantment. She casts aside her fine wedding clothes, takes her chain mail and her sword and follows her brave dwarf retainers into the tunnels under the mountain towards the sleeping kingdom. This queen will decide her own future – and the princess who needs rescuing is not quite what she seems. Twisting together the familiar and the new, this perfectly delicious, captivating and darkly funny tale shows its creators at the peak of their talents.

Lavishly produced, packed with glorious Chris Riddell illustrations enhanced with metallic ink, this is a spectacular and magical gift.



"You can make a little girl into anything if you say the right words. Take her apart until all that’s left is her red, red heart thumping against the world. Stitch her up again real good. Now, maybe you get a woman. If you’re lucky. If that’s what you were after. Just as easy to end up with a blackbird or a circus bear or a coyote. Or a parrot, just saying what’s said to you, doing what’s done to you, copying until it comes so natural that even when you’re all alone you keep on cawing hello pretty bird at the dark."

— Catherynne M. Valente, Six-Gun Snow White

clairelizabethfraser:

fairy tales: Cinderella

When evening came Cinderella wanted to leave, and the prince tried to escort her, but she ran away from him so quickly that he could not follow her. The prince, however, had set a trap. He had had the entire stairway smeared with pitch. When she ran down the stairs, her left slipper stuck in the pitch. The prince picked it up. It was small and dainty, and of pure gold. The next morning, he went with it to the man, and said to him, “No one shall be my wife except for the one whose foot fits this golden shoe." x


9 hours ago · 972 notes · originally from clairelizabethfraser
#cinderella #fairy tales

droo216:

a never-ending list of literary and folkloric otps → Ariel and Prince Eric

There you see herSitting there across the wayShe don’t got a lot to sayBut there’s something about her
And you don’t know whyBut you’re dying to tryYou wanna kiss the girl

droo216:

a never-ending list of literary and folkloric otps → Ariel and Prince Eric

There you see her
Sitting there across the way
She don’t got a lot to say
But there’s something about her

And you don’t know why
But you’re dying to try
You wanna kiss the girl


20 hours ago · 840 notes · originally from droo216
#the little mermaid #fairy tales

"I said I loved her back and when I said it I thought of kissing her and also of shooting her through the eye."

— Six Gun Snow White, Catherynne M. Valente

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in a fairy tale ballet.


examples: лебединое озеро (swan lake), snedronningen (the snow queen), die zwölf tanzenden prinzessinnen (the twelve dancing princesses)

the traditional association of classical ballet with the fairy tale is based not merely on the fame of such ballets as cinderella and la belle au bois dormant., but on a fundamental affinity between the two art forms. like fairy tales, ballets are constructed as highly formalized narratives which make extensive use of repetition and tell their stories primarily through the physical actions of their characters. excessive complexity in plot or characterization is as inappropriate for a ballet as it is for a fairy tale. and ballet, by its very nature, contains an element of fantasy…in ballet, moreoever, as in the literary fairy tale, the supernatural is often used symbolically to express concepts, ideologies, and spiritual beliefs. fairy tale ballets have drawn upon four main sources: fairy bride tales (e.g. giselle ou les wilisi), folk fairy tales (e.g. blaubart), literary fairy talls (e.g. de røde sko), and stories of toys, puppets, or automata that come to life…the ballerina was transformed into a supernatural being, elevated en pointe, literally above the earth. the fairy bride ballet dramatized a central dilemma of romanticism: the search for the unattainable ideal and its often tragic outcome. [the non-human, magical bride is the male protagonist’s] dream, the creature of his poetic imagination, for whom he deserts his earthly love. his attempt to grasp the ideal only ends in destroying it. yet the fairy bride of romantic ballet is more than an elusive symbol [because she can] return love; the story becomes as much her tragedy as his. this humanization of the fairy bride not only increased the complexity and dramatic interest of the romantic ballet, but sometimes made possible a happy ending.



post 751 of an infinity-part series

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in a fairy tale ballet.

examples: лебединое озеро (swan lake), snedronningen (the snow queen), die zwölf tanzenden prinzessinnen (the twelve dancing princesses)

the traditional association of classical ballet with the fairy tale is based not merely on the fame of such ballets as cinderella and la belle au bois dormant., but on a fundamental affinity between the two art forms. like fairy tales, ballets are constructed as highly formalized narratives which make extensive use of repetition and tell their stories primarily through the physical actions of their characters. excessive complexity in plot or characterization is as inappropriate for a ballet as it is for a fairy tale. and ballet, by its very nature, contains an element of fantasy…in ballet, moreoever, as in the literary fairy tale, the supernatural is often used symbolically to express concepts, ideologies, and spiritual beliefs. fairy tale ballets have drawn upon four main sources: fairy bride tales (e.g. giselle ou les wilisi), folk fairy tales (e.g. blaubart), literary fairy talls (e.g. de røde sko), and stories of toys, puppets, or automata that come to life…the ballerina was transformed into a supernatural being, elevated en pointe, literally above the earth. the fairy bride ballet dramatized a central dilemma of romanticism: the search for the unattainable ideal and its often tragic outcome. [the non-human, magical bride is the male protagonist’s] dream, the creature of his poetic imagination, for whom he deserts his earthly love. his attempt to grasp the ideal only ends in destroying it. yet the fairy bride of romantic ballet is more than an elusive symbol [because she can] return love; the story becomes as much her tragedy as his. this humanization of the fairy bride not only increased the complexity and dramatic interest of the romantic ballet, but sometimes made possible a happy ending.

post 751 of an infinity-part series

(via theeternalingenue)



porchwood:

The Youngest Daughter by DimitriKJr (East of the Sun concept art)

porchwood:

The Youngest Daughter by DimitriKJr (East of the Sun concept art)

(via maideninthetower)



"This is what it means to be a woman in this world. Every step is a bargain with pain. Make your black deals in the black wood and decide what you’ll trade for power. For the opposite of weakness, which is not strength but hardness. I am a trap, but so is everything. Pick your price. I am a huckster with a hand in your pocket. I am freedom and I will eat your heart."

— Catherynne M. Valente, Six-Gun Snow White

clairelizabethfraser:

fairy tales: The Sleeping Beauty

A legend circulated throughout the land about the beautiful sleeping Little Brier-Rose, for so the princess was called. Legends also told that from time to time princes came, wanting to force their way through the hedge into the castle. However, they did not succeed, for the thorns held firmly together, as though they had hands, and the young men became stuck in them, could not free themselves, and died miserably.

Many long, long years later, once again a prince came to the country. He heard an old man telling about the thorn hedge. It was said that there was a castle behind it, in which a beautiful princess named Little Brier-Rose had been asleep for a hundred years, and with her the king and the queen and all the royal attendants were sleeping. He also knew from his grandfather that many princes had come and tried to penetrate the thorn hedge, but they had become stuck in it and died a sorrowful death. Then the young man said, “I am not afraid. I will go there and see the beautiful Little Brier-Rose.” x



I will not ask you for forgiveness. What I have done is unforgivable. I was so lost in hatred and revenge. I never dreamed that I could love you so much. You stole what was left of my heart. And now I’ve lost you f o r e v e r.

(Source: blomskvist, via fairytaleslive)


3 days ago · 4,939 notes · originally from lydiadeetzes
#maleficent #movies #fairy tales #sleeping beauty

lady-arryn:



FAIRYTALE MEME:7 Villains - [5/7] Evil Queen from “Snow White”   “After a year had gone by the King took another wife, a beautiful woman, but proud and overbearing, and she could not bear to be surpassed in beauty by any one. She had a magic looking-glass, and she used to stand before it, and look in it, and say, “Looking-glass upon the wall, Who is fairest of us all?” And the looking-glass would answer, “You are fairest of them all.” And she was contented, for she knew that the looking-glass spoke the truth.”

lady-arryn:

FAIRYTALE MEME:
7 Villains - [5/7] Evil Queen from “Snow White”
  After a year had gone by the King took another wife, a beautiful woman, but proud and overbearing, and she could not bear to be surpassed in beauty by any one. She had a magic looking-glass, and she used to stand before it, and look in it, and say, “Looking-glass upon the wall, Who is fairest of us all?” And the looking-glass would answer, “You are fairest of them all.” And she was contented, for she knew that the looking-glass spoke the truth.”

(via droo216)



clairelizabethfraser:

fairy tales:  Little Red Riding Hood

Once upon a time there was a sweet little girl. Everyone who saw her liked her, but most of all her grandmother, who did not know what to give the child next. Once she gave her a little cap made of red velvet. Because it suited her so well, and she wanted to wear it all the time, she came to be known as Little Red Cap. 
One day her mother said to her, “Come Little Red Cap. Here is a piece of cake and a bottle of wine. Take them to your grandmother. She is sick and weak, and they will do her well. Mind your manners and give her my greetings. Behave yourself on the way, and do not leave the path, or you might fall down and break the glass, and then there will be nothing for your sick grandmother.” Little Red Cap promised to obey her mother. 
The grandmother lived out in the woods, a half hour from the village. When Little Red Cap entered the woods a wolf came up to her. She did not know what a wicked animal he was, and was not afraid of him. x

clairelizabethfraser:

fairy tales:  Little Red Riding Hood

Once upon a time there was a sweet little girl. Everyone who saw her liked her, but most of all her grandmother, who did not know what to give the child next. Once she gave her a little cap made of red velvet. Because it suited her so well, and she wanted to wear it all the time, she came to be known as Little Red Cap.

One day her mother said to her, “Come Little Red Cap. Here is a piece of cake and a bottle of wine. Take them to your grandmother. She is sick and weak, and they will do her well. Mind your manners and give her my greetings. Behave yourself on the way, and do not leave the path, or you might fall down and break the glass, and then there will be nothing for your sick grandmother.” Little Red Cap promised to obey her mother.

The grandmother lived out in the woods, a half hour from the village. When Little Red Cap entered the woods a wolf came up to her. She did not know what a wicked animal he was, and was not afraid of him. x



A life for a rose.



caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in an αἴσωπος’s tale.


examples: the goose that laid the golden eggs, the town mouse and the country mouse, the boy who cried wolf

the best-known fables are those by aesop, a freed [african] greek slave who lived in the sixth century bce and who is credited with 200 fables. but the form can be traced back to even earlier times, being found in the egyptian papyri of about 1500 bce…[aesop] had charismatic skills to tell stories for didactic purposes or entertainment. sold as a slave on the greek island samos, aesop exhibited a cleverness greater than that of his master…by the fifth century, the talented and intelligent aesop had apparently taken on legendary dimensions. from antiquity, aesop’s name has been synonymous with fables. based on oral tradition, aesop’s fables were stories with mostly animals as main protagonists (the tricky fox, the powerful lion, etc.). there are also fables that…featured men, gods, [personifications of death, temptation, and more,] and even inanimate objects as characters in a plot that illuminates a moral truth about the human condition or human behaviors. a moral is usually, though not always, explicitly stated at the end of a fable and is meant to give the preceding tale its full force.

post 645 of an infinity-part series

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in an αἴσωπος’s tale.

examples: the goose that laid the golden eggs, the town mouse and the country mouse, the boy who cried wolf

the best-known fables are those by aesop, a freed [african] greek slave who lived in the sixth century bce and who is credited with 200 fables. but the form can be traced back to even earlier times, being found in the egyptian papyri of about 1500 bce…[aesop] had charismatic skills to tell stories for didactic purposes or entertainment. sold as a slave on the greek island samos, aesop exhibited a cleverness greater than that of his master…by the fifth century, the talented and intelligent aesop had apparently taken on legendary dimensions. from antiquity, aesop’s name has been synonymous with fables. based on oral tradition, aesop’s fables were stories with mostly animals as main protagonists (the tricky fox, the powerful lion, etc.). there are also fables that…featured men, gods, [personifications of death, temptation, and more,] and even inanimate objects as characters in a plot that illuminates a moral truth about the human condition or human behaviors. a moral is usually, though not always, explicitly stated at the end of a fable and is meant to give the preceding tale its full force.

post 645 of an infinity-part series

(via bebitched)




Who could ever learn to love a beast? 

Who could ever learn to love a beast? 

(via asheathes)


4 days ago · 1,415 notes · originally from asheathes
#fairy tales #beauty and the beast