a lot of love,
a lot of blood




"On the whole I am inclined to think that a witch should not kiss. Perhaps it is the not being kissed that makes her a witch; perhaps the source of her power is the breath of loneliness around her." - Emma Donoghue

S., 24, Italian. Kate is my internet handle and you can call me that. People scare me so I'll probably never talk to you even if I think you're cool, and if I do it'll be very awkward. English is my second language; I apologize for any mistakes.

I love a lot of things, including fairy tales, mythology, ladies who make music, ladies in general, history, languages. I watch a lot of movies and tv, I ship all the things, and I love Pokémon a lot.
 




Allerleirauh, Germany, 2012 (x)

AllerleirauhGermany, 2012 (x)

(Source: emissarydeatons, via fairytaleslive)



ibuzoo:

Dark Fairytale Princesses  | Snow White

Lips red as blood, skin as the most precious ivory and porcelain, hair as black as silken night, she is always beautiful, no one can ever deny her that. That touch of powerlust that lies in her eyes, her touch a devasting sin, ensnarling nevertheless. Her face splits trough about a million shifts from obsessive to loving to psychotic to terrified to resolved to ice cold. Armies and kingdoms part when she bats her eyelashes, men and women falling on their knees, desiring the untouchable, the ravishing bloom. She is a treat for every warrior and every child, for every king and every queen, she is savage and vicious and vital and you’ll adore her for it. She is toxic, bathes rotten apples in her poisonous blood to gift them to her worshippers who devour them blindly, slowly killing but still keeping you alive, wanting more of her neverending reign over the enigmatic forest, the obscure temple of her noxious cathedral, gladling tossing themselves in agony just to get one imperious glance in her omniscient eyes. 

ibuzoo:

Dark Fairytale Princesses  | Snow White

Lips red as blood, skin as the most precious ivory and porcelain, hair as black as silken night, she is always beautiful, no one can ever deny her that. That touch of powerlust that lies in her eyes, her touch a devasting sin, ensnarling nevertheless. Her face splits trough about a million shifts from obsessive to loving to psychotic to terrified to resolved to ice cold. Armies and kingdoms part when she bats her eyelashes, men and women falling on their knees, desiring the untouchable, the ravishing bloom. She is a treat for every warrior and every child, for every king and every queen, she is savage and vicious and vital and you’ll adore her for it. She is toxic, bathes rotten apples in her poisonous blood to gift them to her worshippers who devour them blindly, slowly killing but still keeping you alive, wanting more of her neverending reign over the enigmatic forest, the obscure temple of her noxious cathedral, gladling tossing themselves in agony just to get one imperious glance in her omniscient eyes. 


22 hours ago · 721 notes · originally from ibuzoo
#snow white #fairy tales #blood//

I had  w i n g s once, and they were  s t r o n g. They could carry me above the clouds and into the headwinds, and they never faltered. Not even once. But they were stolen from me.

(Source: selenanbieber, via asheathes)


1 day ago · 12,867 notes · originally from selenanbieber
#maleficent #movies #fairy tales #sleeping beauty

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in a syrian fairy tale.




examples: قصة الملكة المتسول (the story of the beggar queen), ابن سينا ​​والطاعون الماوس في حلب (avicenna and the mouse plague at aleppo), قصة التاجر (the story of the merchant of khan alwazir)

the most popular types of syrian story structures [are] the gissa (story), the hikaya (tale), and the hudutha (episode).
their purpose on the most explicit level is didactic - that is, to teach lessons in morality and social values or simply to inform about the ways of the world. the stories are presented as serious narratives that are true enough to life so that they might have happened without resort to miraculous or superhuman intervention. in general, this approach means that the actors are human, or, if animals are the main characters, that they behave in a way consistent with reality; that is, they don’t talk or otherwise behave as human beings.
علاء الدين (aladdin), like علي بابا والأربعون لصا (ali baba and the forty thieves), is actually a french-syrian creation from the beginning of the eighteenth century.
a number of conventions and formulae are found in the narratives. many are based on the didactic device of repetition…a common device in arabic, as in english, is to present a point in three repetitious actions…some of the tales appeared in rhyming verse.[syrian fairy tales] differ from the usual arabic literary tradition. in general, arabic prefers an elaborate, embellished plot, replete with florid descriptive passages. but instead, the narratives appearing here are usually composed in a spare, restrained style that outlines only the critical elements of the plot…detail is used only when the plot requires elaboration of a point to make a conclusion more plausible.


post 862 of an infinity-part series






#”commonly occurring formulae are found at the beginning and end of stories…’kan ya makan fi qadim al-ziman’ are words as familiar to a    #syrian child as the words ‘once upon a time’ are to an american child. the two phrases are laden with the magic of anticipation for a story    #as yet unheard or with the delight of recognition in retold tales…the tale also has its consistent ending: aya aya antahat al-hidaya bi    #sha’a am halawiya.’ literally this phrase translates ‘aya aya (nonsense words) thus ends the tale was it disgusting or entertaining?’    #”the storytellers called hakawati knew by heart the basic elements of the long epics…though the origins of the epics are not completely    #clear they most probably began as descriptive stories and only later developed more complicated plots and sometimes even stable rhyming    #versions. although the true events upon which they were based could have been related in the period of half an hour the hakawati could    #elaborate them with embellishments into a thousand hours. in the process the storyteller would draw upon as much of the popular local    #knowledge and wisdom as he could to make the occurrences more appealing and relevant to his audience. because the stories were    #conveyed from mouth to mouth and not written down until later early storytellers had a great deal of leeway in how they related the major    #episodes…it was customary alsofor the listeners to bribe the storyteller to change the details of the episode to favor their own side…    #some of these storytellers would come to be thought of as possessing a special wisdom (hikma or fahm) and people would consult them when    #they needed advice…stories like popular aphorisms do not need to be mutually consistent. each depends for its impact on the context    #in which it is told and the receptivity of its audience to a specific message at the time of its telling…a clue to the origin of some of    #the stories lies in allusions to identifiably christian or muslim themes…syrians as a people are generally tolerant of different religious    #groups and it is unlikely that people generate certain themes to promote their religious beliefs. instead those who first tell the stories    #tend to use the symbols and details with which they are most familiar…[there are certain] details that a syrian might use as markers.    #normally christian stories would not mention divorce polygamy or revenge conflicts. they would be more likely to mention priests and holy    #symbols such as crosses and churches. muslim stories tend to be peopled with sheikhs and bedouin and fateful incidents may occur that    #are not a direct consequence of the actions of the characters as seen for example in قصة اللص القديسين (the story of the saintly thief)…a    #character’s occupation is one important way of identifying religious origin since the different religious communities in the past tended to    #monopolize certain of the trades…the second form of narrative is the tale (hikaya) which is generally a non-serious humorous entertainment    #sometimes appearing in rhyming verse and designed for young children…the third form of narrative (hadutha) [is] called an episode to    #distinguish it from the stories and tales…it can usually be classified as a non-serious narrative.”   

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in a syrian fairy tale.

examples: قصة الملكة المتسول (the story of the beggar queen), ابن سينا ​​والطاعون الماوس في حلب (avicenna and the mouse plague at aleppo), قصة التاجر (the story of the merchant of khan alwazir)

the most popular types of syrian story structures [are] the gissa (story), the hikaya (tale), and the hudutha (episode).

their purpose on the most explicit level is didactic - that is, to teach lessons in morality and social values or simply to inform about the ways of the world. the stories are presented as serious narratives that are true enough to life so that they might have happened without resort to miraculous or superhuman intervention. in general, this approach means that the actors are human, or, if animals are the main characters, that they behave in a way consistent with reality; that is, they don’t talk or otherwise behave as human beings.

علاء الدين (aladdin), like علي بابا والأربعون لصا (ali baba and the forty thieves), is actually a french-syrian creation from the beginning of the eighteenth century.

a number of conventions and formulae are found in the narratives. many are based on the didactic device of repetition…a common device in arabic, as in english, is to present a point in three repetitious actions…some of the tales appeared in rhyming verse.

[syrian fairy tales] differ from the usual arabic literary tradition. in general, arabic prefers an elaborate, embellished plot, replete with florid descriptive passages. but instead, the narratives appearing here are usually composed in a spare, restrained style that outlines only the critical elements of the plot…detail is used only when the plot requires elaboration of a point to make a conclusion more plausible.

post 862 of an infinity-part series

#”commonly occurring formulae are found at the beginning and end of stories…’kan ya makan fi qadim al-ziman’ are words as familiar to a    #syrian child as the words ‘once upon a time’ are to an american child. the two phrases are laden with the magic of anticipation for a story    #as yet unheard or with the delight of recognition in retold tales…the tale also has its consistent ending: aya aya antahat al-hidaya bi    #sha’a am halawiya.’ literally this phrase translates ‘aya aya (nonsense words) thus ends the tale was it disgusting or entertaining?’    #”the storytellers called hakawati knew by heart the basic elements of the long epics…though the origins of the epics are not completely    #clear they most probably began as descriptive stories and only later developed more complicated plots and sometimes even stable rhyming    #versions. although the true events upon which they were based could have been related in the period of half an hour the hakawati could    #elaborate them with embellishments into a thousand hours. in the process the storyteller would draw upon as much of the popular local    #knowledge and wisdom as he could to make the occurrences more appealing and relevant to his audience. because the stories were    #conveyed from mouth to mouth and not written down until later early storytellers had a great deal of leeway in how they related the major    #episodes…it was customary alsofor the listeners to bribe the storyteller to change the details of the episode to favor their own side…    #some of these storytellers would come to be thought of as possessing a special wisdom (hikma or fahm) and people would consult them when    #they needed advice…stories like popular aphorisms do not need to be mutually consistent. each depends for its impact on the context    #in which it is told and the receptivity of its audience to a specific message at the time of its telling…a clue to the origin of some of    #the stories lies in allusions to identifiably christian or muslim themes…syrians as a people are generally tolerant of different religious    #groups and it is unlikely that people generate certain themes to promote their religious beliefs. instead those who first tell the stories    #tend to use the symbols and details with which they are most familiar…[there are certain] details that a syrian might use as markers.    #normally christian stories would not mention divorce polygamy or revenge conflicts. they would be more likely to mention priests and holy    #symbols such as crosses and churches. muslim stories tend to be peopled with sheikhs and bedouin and fateful incidents may occur that    #are not a direct consequence of the actions of the characters as seen for example in قصة اللص القديسين (the story of the saintly thief)…a    #character’s occupation is one important way of identifying religious origin since the different religious communities in the past tended to    #monopolize certain of the trades…the second form of narrative is the tale (hikaya) which is generally a non-serious humorous entertainment    #sometimes appearing in rhyming verse and designed for young children…the third form of narrative (hadutha) [is] called an episode to    #distinguish it from the stories and tales…it can usually be classified as a non-serious narrative.”   


1 day ago · 40 notes · originally from caterinasforzas
#fairy tales #fashion #syria

phi-yen:

Inspired by my matryoshka dolls and red riding hood, this happened haha. I forgot how to delete backgrounds so… sorry gaiz.

phi-yen:

Inspired by my matryoshka dolls and red riding hood, this happened haha. I forgot how to delete backgrounds so… sorry gaiz.

(via maideninthetower)


2 days ago · 245 notes · originally from phi-yen
#red riding hood #fairy tales #art

"When her kiss transforms the Beast, she is furious.

"You should have warned me! Here I was smitten by an exceptional being, and all of a sudden, my fiance becomes an ordinary distinguished young man!""

the 1909 play Beauty and the Beast:  Fantasy in Two Acts by Fernand Noziere, the very first published version of the story where the Beauty is disappointed when the Beast transforms into a human at the end.

(Source: corseque, via okayophelia)



ibuzoo:

Dark Fairytale Princesses - Ariel, the little Mermaid
She marks her victims with salty kisses, lips tasting of water and beauty, a deceit to hide the thirst for human blood and bones. The sea bends to her will and the tides and waves will lull her song like a hook, a lure for fishermen and helpless sailors which are mesmerized, the melody clouding their eyes and minds. She dallies with her pray, let them follow her in the deepest dark of the sea, gives them watery kisses and hot breath to entice them to her cave where she claws her nails and fingers deep in the flesh, devouring it to the bones but nothing will ever appease her hunger.

ibuzoo:

Dark Fairytale Princesses - Ariel, the little Mermaid

She marks her victims with salty kisses, lips tasting of water and beauty, a deceit to hide the thirst for human blood and bones. The sea bends to her will and the tides and waves will lull her song like a hook, a lure for fishermen and helpless sailors which are mesmerized, the melody clouding their eyes and minds. She dallies with her pray, let them follow her in the deepest dark of the sea, gives them watery kisses and hot breath to entice them to her cave where she claws her nails and fingers deep in the flesh, devouring it to the bones but nothing will ever appease her hunger.


2 days ago · 259 notes · originally from ibuzoo
#the little mermaid #fairy tales #nsfw//

Are you not afraid to dance with me?

(Source: theenglishladye, via maideninthetower)



Disney Scenery Porn ⌘ Cinderella (part 1)

(via droo216)


3 days ago · 6,559 notes · originally from oenomaus
#cinderella #disney #movies #fairy tales

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in a kanien’kehá:ka fairy tale.

examples: káryo kanya’kwari’kó:wa (the monster bear), ratorats ok oskenón:ton (the hunter and the stag), ěrhar yakon:kwe (the dog girl)

there are lots of traditional mohawk legends and fairy tales. storytelling is very important to the mohawk indian culture.
[two important mohawk hero figures are] sky woman’s twin grandsons, okwiraseh (maple sapling) and tawiskaron (flint)…yakonenyoya’ks (stone-throwers) [are] little people of [mohawk tales]. they are dwarf-like nature spirits about two feet tall.
atenenyarhu (stonecoat) [is a] mythological giant of the iroquois tribes, with skin as hard as stone. kanontsistóntie’s (flying head) [is a] horned in the form of a disembodied head, usually created during a particularly violent murder…onyare [is] a dragon-like horned serpent of the great lakes, feared for its habit of capsizing canoes and eating people.

post 863 of an infinity-part series


#”with the arrival of europeans the process of change in iroquoian folklore and culture accelerated and intensified.    #the mohawk as the easternmost of the iroquoian tribes experienced the longest and most intense contact with the europeans    #[so] segments of european fairy tales became incorporated into the iroquoian oral tradition.”  

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in a kanien’kehá:ka fairy tale.

examples: káryo kanya’kwari’kó:wa (the monster bear), ratorats ok oskenón:ton (the hunter and the stag), ěrhar yakon:kwe (the dog girl)

there are lots of traditional mohawk legends and fairy tales. storytelling is very important to the mohawk indian culture.

[two important mohawk hero figures are] sky woman’s twin grandsons, okwiraseh (maple sapling) and tawiskaron (flint)…yakonenyoya’ks (stone-throwers) [are] little people of [mohawk tales]. they are dwarf-like nature spirits about two feet tall.

atenenyarhu (stonecoat) [is a] mythological giant of the iroquois tribes, with skin as hard as stone. kanontsistóntie’s (flying head) [is a] horned in the form of a disembodied head, usually created during a particularly violent murder…onyare [is] a dragon-like horned serpent of the great lakes, feared for its habit of capsizing canoes and eating people.

post 863 of an infinity-part series

#”with the arrival of europeans the process of change in iroquoian folklore and culture accelerated and intensified.    #the mohawk as the easternmost of the iroquoian tribes experienced the longest and most intense contact with the europeans    #[so] segments of european fairy tales became incorporated into the iroquoian oral tradition.”  



fuckyeahvintageillustration:

'Snowdrop & other tales' by the Brothers Grimm; illustrated by Arthur Rackham. Published 1920 by E.P. Dutton & Company, New York.

See the complete book here.



ibuzoo:

Dark Fairytale Prinzessen - Snow Queen
She is made of stronger stuff then flesh and blood, her bones a glistening white crytal, winter diamonds that thirst for ruby blood in the purest snow. She is the maiden queen for no man ever found the way trough the sylvan labyrinth. Snowflakes and a winter song carried by old firs lull little children trough her maze to her castle coated in perpetual snow. Still you won’t hear laughter or childish talks out of the castle’s walls and every now and then you can see the ruby red on winter woods, corpses of infants and a cavernous hole in their chests.The heart of a child is all she desires.

ibuzoo:

Dark Fairytale Prinzessen - Snow Queen

She is made of stronger stuff then flesh and blood, her bones a glistening white crytal, winter diamonds that thirst for ruby blood in the purest snow. She is the maiden queen for no man ever found the way trough the sylvan labyrinth. Snowflakes and a winter song carried by old firs lull little children trough her maze to her castle coated in perpetual snow. Still you won’t hear laughter or childish talks out of the castle’s walls and every now and then you can see the ruby red on winter woods, corpses of infants and a cavernous hole in their chests.The heart of a child is all she desires.


4 days ago · 47 notes · originally from ibuzoo
#snow queen #fairy tales #blood//

Three Wishes for Cinderella // Tři oříšky pro Popelku (Václav Vorlíček - 1973)



caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in a lincolnshire fairy tale.

examples: th’ lass ‘at seed her awn graave dug (a bluebeard variant), th’ buried moon, t’ curate ‘at caame fra lunnun

lincolnshire, a county [in the east of england] with many variations in the dialect, once nurtured many fairy tales, and though these stories may no longer be told as often as they once were, they still resonate within the rural landscape.
from the dark tales of the black dog that would cross the marshes at night and the lincolnshire imp that haunted lincoln cathedral to the humorous tales of th’ lad ‘at went oot to look fer fools and th’ frit farmer an’ th’ boggard, so many of these tales are rooted the county…tales of witches, fairies, ghosts, giants, dragons, wraiths, werewolves, kings, monks, and hermits [abound].
in our most familiar fairy tales, murder and theft and lying are often accepted as the natural path towards success…wonderful, cold-blooded, barbaric princes and princesses [populate lincolnshire] storydom.
tales about characters within the rural landscape [are common in the lincolnshire fairy tale tradition, such as a peäce aboot poächin’ and the fox and the horse stable]…there are many stories found in lincolnshire relating to specific stones, [such as] the tale of grim and boundel and the two stones they stole from the danes to help the people of lindsey prosper.
in th’ green mist and th’ strangers’ share, there are traces of ancient rites…in th’ dead hand, there is an intimate acquaintance with the bog-spirits that contrasts oddly with the later influence of christianity in the almost biblical lamentation of the mourning mother.

post 851 of an infinity-part series


#also: ”these wild tales [are] of witchcraft and the spirit-world in this little isolated home of folklore…[there are] awesome tales    #of boggarts and todlowries that have still local habitations as well as names; and weird stories of witches and    #woe-women and their spells; and strange rambling histories that seemed like peeps into a bygone world where the    #fantastic spirits were more real than the trembling fearing conciliating people they alternately helped and oppressed.”    #lincolnshire storytellers ”write in their own words about their own ways…it is well to mention that in lindsey    #the letter u is generally pronounced like the oo in foot; tha the y in my is usually though not always short like the i in pig;    #that as a general rule the vowel sounds in the pronouns are shortened as much as possible; that one written here won rhymes with on;    #that war swarm want wasp etc. have the a sounded like a in ant; and that the pronoun i is often sounded nearly like ǎ.”    #”even their speech sounds strange to a modern english ear for it is almost pure saxon and [recorded lincolnshire tales] keep many    #of the original inflections…surely no county in england has known more varied masters; there are many norse and danish words    #and some roman and norman names; but in the common speech french and latin derivatives are conspicuous by their absence.”    #lincolnshire ”is one of the largest counties in england and displays varied landscapes…    #predominantly surrounded by water the county has been heavily influenced by the rivers.”    #other landscapes that serve as the settings for lincolnshire fairy tales are marshes wolds cliffs carrs fens and the isle of axholme.    #lincolnshire fairy tale characters inhabit ”a region of bogs and swamps of fever-haunted marshes and ague-infested lowlands.”    #”at all times [lincolnshire] seems a fit resting-place for the last days of a dying mythology.”    #magical stones also appear in ”many tales of william the hermit of lindholme and tommy lindum of wrott”    #as well as the tales of yallery brown fonaby sack stone and the anwick drake stones.    

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in a lincolnshire fairy tale.

examples: th’ lass ‘at seed her awn graave dug (a bluebeard variant), th’ buried moon, t’ curate ‘at caame fra lunnun

lincolnshire, a county [in the east of england] with many variations in the dialect, once nurtured many fairy tales, and though these stories may no longer be told as often as they once were, they still resonate within the rural landscape.

from the dark tales of the black dog that would cross the marshes at night and the lincolnshire imp that haunted lincoln cathedral to the humorous tales of th’ lad ‘at went oot to look fer fools and th’ frit farmer an’ th’ boggard, so many of these tales are rooted the county…tales of witches, fairies, ghosts, giantsdragons, wraiths, werewolves, kings, monks, and hermits [abound].

in our most familiar fairy tales, murder and theft and lying are often accepted as the natural path towards success…wonderful, cold-blooded, barbaric princes and princesses [populate lincolnshire] storydom.

tales about characters within the rural landscape [are common in the lincolnshire fairy tale tradition, such as a peäce aboot poächin’ and the fox and the horse stable]…there are many stories found in lincolnshire relating to specific stones, [such as] the tale of grim and boundel and the two stones they stole from the danes to help the people of lindsey prosper.

in th’ green mist and th’ strangers’ share, there are traces of ancient rites…in th’ dead hand, there is an intimate acquaintance with the bog-spirits that contrasts oddly with the later influence of christianity in the almost biblical lamentation of the mourning mother.

post 851 of an infinity-part series

#also: ”these wild tales [are] of witchcraft and the spirit-world in this little isolated home of folklore…[there are] awesome tales    #of boggarts and todlowries that have still local habitations as well as names; and weird stories of witches and    #woe-women and their spells; and strange rambling histories that seemed like peeps into a bygone world where the    #fantastic spirits were more real than the trembling fearing conciliating people they alternately helped and oppressed.”    #lincolnshire storytellers ”write in their own words about their own ways…it is well to mention that in lindsey    #the letter u is generally pronounced like the oo in foot; tha the y in my is usually though not always short like the i in pig;    #that as a general rule the vowel sounds in the pronouns are shortened as much as possible; that one written here won rhymes with on;    #that war swarm want wasp etc. have the a sounded like a in ant; and that the pronoun i is often sounded nearly like ǎ.”    #”even their speech sounds strange to a modern english ear for it is almost pure saxon and [recorded lincolnshire tales] keep many    #of the original inflections…surely no county in england has known more varied masters; there are many norse and danish words    #and some roman and norman names; but in the common speech french and latin derivatives are conspicuous by their absence.”    #lincolnshire ”is one of the largest counties in england and displays varied landscapes…    #predominantly surrounded by water the county has been heavily influenced by the rivers.”    #other landscapes that serve as the settings for lincolnshire fairy tales are marshes wolds cliffs carrs fens and the isle of axholme.    #lincolnshire fairy tale characters inhabit ”a region of bogs and swamps of fever-haunted marshes and ague-infested lowlands.”    #”at all times [lincolnshire] seems a fit resting-place for the last days of a dying mythology.”    #magical stones also appear in ”many tales of william the hermit of lindholme and tommy lindum of wrott”    #as well as the tales of yallery brown fonaby sack stone and the anwick drake stones.    



ibuzoo:

Dark Fairytale Princesses | Sleeping Beauty

Crowned with thorns and bloody roses, the sylvan queen, her beauty mystifies her like silver filaments of a spinning wheel strewn with drops of gold, wears her bloom like a bloody bejeweled knife. She’s a force of nature and beyond control, a raging hurricane at the centre of a man’s desire. She’s wild, she’s the hunter and the prey, a siren of the woods, collects corpses of travelers and hunters that she lurked in her dark meadow long time ago. She loves and make you feel loved so deeply it will consume you, the feeling running through you too powerful, too profound, piercing your soul in the most beautiful agony until you fall in the deepest slumber. She beds you on brier wood and rose petals, nourishes from the sweetest dreams of a lover, from nightmares of carnivores and cannibals, sucks you dry until nothing remains than an empty body willing to serve her until eternity. 

ibuzoo:

Dark Fairytale Princesses | Sleeping Beauty

Crowned with thorns and bloody roses, the sylvan queen, her beauty mystifies her like silver filaments of a spinning wheel strewn with drops of gold, wears her bloom like a bloody bejeweled knife. She’s a force of nature and beyond control, a raging hurricane at the centre of a man’s desire. She’s wild, she’s the hunter and the prey, a siren of the woods, collects corpses of travelers and hunters that she lurked in her dark meadow long time ago. She loves and make you feel loved so deeply it will consume you, the feeling running through you too powerful, too profound, piercing your soul in the most beautiful agony until you fall in the deepest slumber. She beds you on brier wood and rose petals, nourishes from the sweetest dreams of a lover, from nightmares of carnivores and cannibals, sucks you dry until nothing remains than an empty body willing to serve her until eternity. 


1 week ago · 943 notes · originally from ibuzoo
#sleeping beauty #fairy tales