"On the whole I am inclined to think that a witch should not kiss. Perhaps it is the not being kissed that makes her a witch; perhaps the source of her power is the breath of loneliness around her." - Emma Donoghue

S., 23, Italian. Kate is my internet handle and you can call me that. People scare me so I'll probably never talk to you even if I think you're cool, and if I do it'll be very awkward. English is my second language; I apologize for any mistakes.

I love a lot of things, including fairy tales, mythology, ladies who make music, ladies in general, history, languages. I watch a lot of movies and tv, I ship all the things, and I love Pokémon a lot.
 




FAIRYTALE MEME: 9 Fairytales - [6/9] The Little Mermaid  “Nothing gave the youngest Princess greater pleasure than to hear about the world of human beings up above. She made her grandmother tell all she knew about ships and towns, people and animals; but what fascinated her beyond words was that the flowers on earth were scented, while those at the bottom of the sea were not, that the woods were green and that the fishes one saw among the branches could sing so loudly and sweetly that it was a delight to hear them.”

FAIRYTALE MEME: 9 Fairytales - [6/9] The Little Mermaid
  “Nothing gave the youngest Princess greater pleasure than to hear about the world of human beings up above. She made her grandmother tell all she knew about ships and towns, people and animals; but what fascinated her beyond words was that the flowers on earth were scented, while those at the bottom of the sea were not, that the woods were green and that the fishes one saw among the branches could sing so loudly and sweetly that it was a delight to hear them.”



caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in an iraqi fairy tale.


examples: هاجر (hājir, a snow white variant), الأمير وابنة البائع (the prince and the daughter of the thorn-seller, a beauty and the beast variant), ومسحور اللقالق (the enchanted storks)

iraq has been called the cradle of mankind and, if this is the case, one would expect to find traces of some of the stories which amused mankind in its childhood; for in every country, folklore is more ancient than history; that is to say, it holds embalmed, like flies in amber, scraps of mythology, religion, customs, and sagas which are far older than the fable that clothes them…iraq has been one of the world’s highways and battlegrounds. it was once the great road to and from india, china, and the far east. wave after wave of migration, conquest, and settlement have surged over it…merchant caravans, jewish captives, settlers, and slaves, travelers, and wanderers must all have added to the iraqi folklore and distributed it…it is not surprising, therefore, if the fairy tales of iraq are of a composite nature, and much of the material gathered here is already familiar, if only in translations from the persian, armenian, and turkish, not to mention the more universally known grimm…[aside from] the jinni, ifrit, and ghul, which appear so often in the pages of the arabian nights, [there are] other demons and ogres which figure in the tales of the iraqis…the s’iluwa occupies much the same role in iraqi legend as the witch or ogress in western fairy tales…she is fond of human flesh, but at the same time she has a partiality for human lovers…the dami is a half-bestial ogress [who] often takes the role assigned in european fairy stories to the wolf.


post 732 of an infinity-part series



 #”iraq has a very rich cultural heritage. iraqi folklore can be considered as the mother of the asian folklores    #for the tales of bagdad have been entertaining and amazing the people from all over the world for centuries.    #tales from iraq are about the adventures of traders kings and queens mysterious events and animals remote lands and people.”    #”polished by the streams of time the oral traditions of iraq encompass a rich variety of fairy tales ranging from fanciful fables and    #heroic myths to stories derived from religions sagas and customs. countless waves of migration conquest and settlement    #- sumerian chaldaean cassite assyrian persian arab and turkish - have surged across the region along with merchant caravans pilgrims    #wanderers and other travelers. each contributed fresh elements to the native folklore.”    #iraqi fairy tales are ”populated by determined princes courageous young people virtuous girls greedy men cunning women wise men.”    #”they deal with monsters heroes fairies sultans peasants fishermen and trades-people; they carry moral teachings    #and feature speaking animals and some convey surprisingly subversive messages about gender relations and social power structures.”    #iraqi fairy tales feature ”demons who come roaring down from the sky irresistibly beautiful sprites and fairies fire-breathing dragons…    #there are stories that revolve around clever youths of apparently humble origin who usually turn out to be sons of kings. readers may be    #surprised to discover the story of excalibur embedded in the king who had seven sons…the mangy epithet [of the stock character of    #the mangy kid] comes from a scalp disease common in the middle east that results in the loss of most of the hair but it leaves tufts of hair    #over the scalp that are particularly unattractive. the mangy kid in stories invariably extremely clever belying his appearance as a    #dim-witted member of the lowest classes of society. the merhorse or sea-horse (bahri) is a wise talking horse with magical powers that lives    #in the sea (king ahmad). it becomes a valuable companion adviser and savior to its master…most of the tales are concerned in one way or    #another with justice and usually justice needs the intervention of some external (and often supernatural) agency to be done.”    #much like the fairy worlds of other cultures iraqi fairy tales featured an enchanted island called hufaidh. ”on it are palaces and    #palm trees and gardens of pomegranates and the buffaloes are bigger than ours. but no one knows exactly where it is…anyone who sees    #hufaidh is bewitched and afterwards no one can understand his words…jinns can hide the island from anyone who comes near it.”    #iraqi fairy tale motifs include ”the overnight magical destruction of all the work completed during the day the watch for the monster that    #is causing the destruction and an eavesdropper who listens for the secret name of this monster which will give him power over it.”  

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in an iraqi fairy tale.

examples: هاجر (hājir, a snow white variant), الأمير وابنة البائع (the prince and the daughter of the thorn-seller, a beauty and the beast variant), ومسحور اللقالق (the enchanted storks)

iraq has been called the cradle of mankind and, if this is the case, one would expect to find traces of some of the stories which amused mankind in its childhood; for in every country, folklore is more ancient than history; that is to say, it holds embalmed, like flies in amber, scraps of mythology, religion, customs, and sagas which are far older than the fable that clothes them…iraq has been one of the world’s highways and battlegrounds. it was once the great road to and from india, china, and the far east. wave after wave of migration, conquest, and settlement have surged over it…merchant caravans, jewish captives, settlers, and slaves, travelers, and wanderers must all have added to the iraqi folklore and distributed it…it is not surprising, therefore, if the fairy tales of iraq are of a composite nature, and much of the material gathered here is already familiar, if only in translations from the persian, armenian, and turkish, not to mention the more universally known grimm…[aside from] the jinni, ifrit, and ghul, which appear so often in the pages of the arabian nights, [there are] other demons and ogres which figure in the tales of the iraqis…the s’iluwa occupies much the same role in iraqi legend as the witch or ogress in western fairy tales…she is fond of human flesh, but at the same time she has a partiality for human lovers…the dami is a half-bestial ogress [who] often takes the role assigned in european fairy stories to the wolf.

post 732 of an infinity-part series

 #”iraq has a very rich cultural heritage. iraqi folklore can be considered as the mother of the asian folklores    #for the tales of bagdad have been entertaining and amazing the people from all over the world for centuries.    #tales from iraq are about the adventures of traders kings and queens mysterious events and animals remote lands and people.”    #”polished by the streams of time the oral traditions of iraq encompass a rich variety of fairy tales ranging from fanciful fables and    #heroic myths to stories derived from religions sagas and customs. countless waves of migration conquest and settlement    #- sumerian chaldaean cassite assyrian persian arab and turkish - have surged across the region along with merchant caravans pilgrims    #wanderers and other travelers. each contributed fresh elements to the native folklore.”    #iraqi fairy tales are ”populated by determined princes courageous young people virtuous girls greedy men cunning women wise men.”    #”they deal with monsters heroes fairies sultans peasants fishermen and trades-people; they carry moral teachings    #and feature speaking animals and some convey surprisingly subversive messages about gender relations and social power structures.”    #iraqi fairy tales feature ”demons who come roaring down from the sky irresistibly beautiful sprites and fairies fire-breathing dragons…    #there are stories that revolve around clever youths of apparently humble origin who usually turn out to be sons of kings. readers may be    #surprised to discover the story of excalibur embedded in the king who had seven sons…the mangy epithet [of the stock character of    #the mangy kid] comes from a scalp disease common in the middle east that results in the loss of most of the hair but it leaves tufts of hair    #over the scalp that are particularly unattractive. the mangy kid in stories invariably extremely clever belying his appearance as a    #dim-witted member of the lowest classes of society. the merhorse or sea-horse (bahri) is a wise talking horse with magical powers that lives    #in the sea (king ahmad). it becomes a valuable companion adviser and savior to its master…most of the tales are concerned in one way or    #another with justice and usually justice needs the intervention of some external (and often supernatural) agency to be done.”    #much like the fairy worlds of other cultures iraqi fairy tales featured an enchanted island called hufaidh. ”on it are palaces and    #palm trees and gardens of pomegranates and the buffaloes are bigger than ours. but no one knows exactly where it is…anyone who sees    #hufaidh is bewitched and afterwards no one can understand his words…jinns can hide the island from anyone who comes near it.”    #iraqi fairy tale motifs include ”the overnight magical destruction of all the work completed during the day the watch for the monster that    #is causing the destruction and an eavesdropper who listens for the secret name of this monster which will give him power over it.”  


3 days ago · 197 notes · originally from caterinasforzas
#fairy tales #fashion #iraq

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in an algerian fairy tale (requested by dreamsofadventures).

examples: الصياد والوحش (the agile hunter and the she-ogre), ابن آوى والفلاح (the jackal and the farmer), أكثر جمالا من القمر (more beautiful than the moon, a snow white variant),

there is a more significant preference related to the popularity accorded to [algerian] fairy tales containing female monsters over those which do not…one of [algerian women’s] means of critical resistance and self-affirmation is the deployment of female folkloric monsters in some sort of symbolic violence directed against the patriarchal order of things…the narrative process of female monstrification in the myths [in which the algerian eve deviated from the mandate of procreative sexuality and was turned into a human flesh-eating monster as a punishment] is subverted in favor of women in the fairy tales [that] offer us a representation of teryel as a social non-conformist, a discontent with man’s civilization…teryel often lives to a healthy advanced age because of her practice of birth control…female monsters [in algerian fairy tales] are not simply frightful representations of vice so as to be seen and hated…[there is] an iconoclastic tendency in their opposition to the mythic iconography of rebellious women as social, epistemological, political, and economic monsters. in the fairy tales of the monstrous, it is less a matter that women’s v(o)ices are represented as monsters, and more a question of the prominence or salience given to resisting female monsters, as well as the complex and attractive manner in which they are presented by the predominantly female storytellers…female narrators are not solely guardians of traditions [but] underground rebels who undermine the prevalent unequal gender power relations.

post 716 of an infinity-part series


 #also: ”teryel [is sometimes portrayed] as a single aged woman reigning singlehanded over her home and her fields;    #sometimes as a single mother or parent with just one daughter the beautiful loundja or the ugly aicha boutliss; sometimes as married to an    #ogre with no children at all; and still at other times as a dominating wife to a henpecked husband. all these anti-family types are    #monstrified forms of the kabyle family type marked off by patriarchy patrilinearity and the production of a huge number of male children.”    #”the irony of [the agile hunter and the she-ogre] is that he the agile hunter who is supposed to be a protector of the village from    #external danger finds himself married to teryel and obliged to submit to her rule…teryel’s defiance of the tajmait and her conquest of the    #hunter reverse or rather subvert the sexual roles and the values that the same political organization has assigned to men and women.”    #”women are often considered to be the custodians of the oral heritage that guarantees the identity of the community…the yelli-s wwergaz    #(the daughter of a ma [in fairy tales]) is a rural heroïne who has to be young clever productive and fertile. she is assertive but she is    #expected to control her words because speaking freely could affect her fertility and it might establish a man/woman relationship that goes    #beyond mere speaking. the aim of the rural heroine is to acquire a house and a husband. once this need is fulfilled a new problem arises:    #how to remain in the house and (or) married. this second problem is solved by having children or thanks to the woman’s intelligence.    #four heroines assert female autonomy. the girl fadma is not only a cultural heroine but also a social heroine. she is opposed to the ogress    #and to her father. fadma’s father fails to handle culture and society because he is unable to deal with the negative femininity represented    #by the ogress and he allows his own interest to prevail over the collective interest. where the father fails the daughter succeeds:    #she founds a village as in other narratives does mqidec the hero par excellence in kabyle oral narratives.”    #”in the story of the kabyle cinderella there is recognition of the female manipulation of the public sphere and of the superior    #intelligence of the girl who surpasses her husband. specific female interests such as assertion of monogamy and of the privileges    #attributed to one’s own child are legalized by the actions of other two heroines respectively lalla lehkima and the intelligent widow.”    #”tuareg literature inclues a wealth of fables satires fairy tales of wizards and magic historical and islamic legends.    #an entire cycle deals with the prehistoric amănokal aligurrăn or ămămăllăn and his sly nephew.”  

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in an algerian fairy tale (requested by dreamsofadventures).

examples: الصياد والوحش (the agile hunter and the she-ogre), ابن آوى والفلاح (the jackal and the farmer), أكثر جمالا من القمر (more beautiful than the moon, a snow white variant),

there is a more significant preference related to the popularity accorded to [algerian] fairy tales containing female monsters over those which do not…one of [algerian women’s] means of critical resistance and self-affirmation is the deployment of female folkloric monsters in some sort of symbolic violence directed against the patriarchal order of things…the narrative process of female monstrification in the myths [in which the algerian eve deviated from the mandate of procreative sexuality and was turned into a human flesh-eating monster as a punishment] is subverted in favor of women in the fairy tales [that] offer us a representation of teryel as a social non-conformist, a discontent with man’s civilization…teryel often lives to a healthy advanced age because of her practice of birth control…female monsters [in algerian fairy tales] are not simply frightful representations of vice so as to be seen and hated…[there is] an iconoclastic tendency in their opposition to the mythic iconography of rebellious women as social, epistemological, political, and economic monsters. in the fairy tales of the monstrous, it is less a matter that women’s v(o)ices are represented as monsters, and more a question of the prominence or salience given to resisting female monsters, as well as the complex and attractive manner in which they are presented by the predominantly female storytellers…female narrators are not solely guardians of traditions [but] underground rebels who undermine the prevalent unequal gender power relations.

post 716 of an infinity-part series

 #also: ”teryel [is sometimes portrayed] as a single aged woman reigning singlehanded over her home and her fields;    #sometimes as a single mother or parent with just one daughter the beautiful loundja or the ugly aicha boutliss; sometimes as married to an    #ogre with no children at all; and still at other times as a dominating wife to a henpecked husband. all these anti-family types are    #monstrified forms of the kabyle family type marked off by patriarchy patrilinearity and the production of a huge number of male children.”    #”the irony of [the agile hunter and the she-ogre] is that he the agile hunter who is supposed to be a protector of the village from    #external danger finds himself married to teryel and obliged to submit to her rule…teryel’s defiance of the tajmait and her conquest of the    #hunter reverse or rather subvert the sexual roles and the values that the same political organization has assigned to men and women.”    #”women are often considered to be the custodians of the oral heritage that guarantees the identity of the community…the yelli-s wwergaz    #(the daughter of a ma [in fairy tales]) is a rural heroïne who has to be young clever productive and fertile. she is assertive but she is    #expected to control her words because speaking freely could affect her fertility and it might establish a man/woman relationship that goes    #beyond mere speaking. the aim of the rural heroine is to acquire a house and a husband. once this need is fulfilled a new problem arises:    #how to remain in the house and (or) married. this second problem is solved by having children or thanks to the woman’s intelligence.    #four heroines assert female autonomy. the girl fadma is not only a cultural heroine but also a social heroine. she is opposed to the ogress    #and to her father. fadma’s father fails to handle culture and society because he is unable to deal with the negative femininity represented    #by the ogress and he allows his own interest to prevail over the collective interest. where the father fails the daughter succeeds:    #she founds a village as in other narratives does mqidec the hero par excellence in kabyle oral narratives.”    #”in the story of the kabyle cinderella there is recognition of the female manipulation of the public sphere and of the superior    #intelligence of the girl who surpasses her husband. specific female interests such as assertion of monogamy and of the privileges    #attributed to one’s own child are legalized by the actions of other two heroines respectively lalla lehkima and the intelligent widow.”    #”tuareg literature inclues a wealth of fables satires fairy tales of wizards and magic historical and islamic legends.    #an entire cycle deals with the prehistoric amănokal aligurrăn or ămămăllăn and his sly nephew.”  


5 days ago · 61 notes · originally from caterinasforzas
#fairy tales #fashion #algeria

And while Cinderella and her Prince did live happily ever after… the point, gentlemen, is that they lived.

(Source: goslinger, via fairytaleslive)


5 days ago · 9,993 notes · originally from goslinger
#ever after #movies #cinderella #fairy tales

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in a sudanese fairy tale.

examples: al-malik al-bakhil (the miserly king), akhdar azar fi gazaz (the green one in a glass), achol wa walidataha al-labwa bil-tabani (achol and her adoptive lioness mother)

the narrators of [sudanese fairy tales or ahaji (singular hujwa)] are usually women in the community, especially grandmothers…the stories invariably have happy endings and are full of enchantment and fanciful scenes…a moral twist and a didactic conclusion are always expected…supernatural beings like jinn, ghouls, su’luwwa, and sorcerers lend a helping hand to alter the path of the narrative and secure a happy ending…almost invariably, the central character is a female [who is] resourceful and can work all sorts of miracles and ingenuous feats…in these stories, women know that they have power and are not afraid to use it, even when the outcome may prove tragic. in all these narratives where women prove themselves the equals of men, the social and political status of the whole family is changed by the efforts and accomplishments of a girl…the female protagonist in the ahaji reaches its culmination and legendary status in the story of fatna al-samha [fatna the beautiful, a cinderella variant]…fatna al-samha is the tale which represents all [sudanese] fairy tales. it is the one hujwa that assumed a national identity. in songs, poetry, prose narratives, fatna al-samha is frequently used as a metaphor for the beloved, the perfect women…fatna is extremely beautiful, extremely intelligent, extremely brave (if somewhat unscrupulous). only a man who is her match can win her in the end…she shapes her future life, makes her own fortune…male characters play only secondary, complementary roles. they were there as means for the heroine to fulfill her dreams.

post 688 of an infinity-part series


#also: [sudanese fairy tales] are told to children as bedtime stories or as means of entertainment during the long and dark evenings.    #[just like in the nigerian fairy tale tradition] narrating stories in daytime is strongly discouraged and at times considered taboo.”    #”magic is there for all good (and beautiful) people to make use of…in the lady of the new Island    #magic allows a man to get pregnant instead of his wife when he ate the magic meat prepared to help her get pregnant.”    #”stories can be told in prose or in verse with or without music accompaniment. however audience participation remains crucial and is    #inseparable from the performance of storytelling…audience participation can be indirect (as when stories are tailored to the tastes of the    #audience or to deliver a particular message) but often it takes a more positive form (as when answering quizzes repeating habitual or ritual    #phrases or taking part in the performance by dancing or singing refrains). ultimately the audience becomes the hero the central actor.”    #[sudanese fairy tales] mirror local traditions and draw from local myths legends and histories as well as from scenes of everyday life.”    #”the older members of the community use these tales as ‘social stories’ to indirectly and craftily inject the desired moral values    #according to the conventions of the community or the tribe and to warn (the listeners) against ignoring or breaking them.”    #”[the sudanese fairy tale heroine’s] weapons for survival include her beauty intelligence and resourcefulness. and then there is magic and    #miracles. but above all there is the power of disguise. a woman can beat the world of men by becoming part of it. in these tales the episode    #of the disguise of femininity plays a central part. a certain female disguises herself and passes for a man because she is dressed    #in men’s clothes and behaves in a masculine manner. she then forsakes her seclusion seeks adventures    #achieves wonders competes with men and mostly emulates them.”    #”pre-islamic nubian society in sudan was a matriarchal society while the arab-islamic society which succeeded it [wasn’t]…the grandmother    #continues to play a matriarchal role which bridges these two worlds. she wields undisputed authority over both men and women. through her    #role as a storyteller she also bridges the worlds of fact and fancy and wields a formative influence over culture.” 

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in a sudanese fairy tale.

examples: al-malik al-bakhil (the miserly king), akhdar azar fi gazaz (the green one in a glass), achol wa walidataha al-labwa bil-tabani (achol and her adoptive lioness mother)

the narrators of [sudanese fairy tales or ahaji (singular hujwa)] are usually women in the community, especially grandmothers…the stories invariably have happy endings and are full of enchantment and fanciful scenes…a moral twist and a didactic conclusion are always expected…supernatural beings like jinn, ghouls, su’luwwa, and sorcerers lend a helping hand to alter the path of the narrative and secure a happy ending…almost invariably, the central character is a female [who is] resourceful and can work all sorts of miracles and ingenuous feats…in these stories, women know that they have power and are not afraid to use it, even when the outcome may prove tragic. in all these narratives where women prove themselves the equals of men, the social and political status of the whole family is changed by the efforts and accomplishments of a girl…the female protagonist in the ahaji reaches its culmination and legendary status in the story of fatna al-samha [fatna the beautiful, a cinderella variant]…fatna al-samha is the tale which represents all [sudanese] fairy tales. it is the one hujwa that assumed a national identity. in songs, poetry, prose narratives, fatna al-samha is frequently used as a metaphor for the beloved, the perfect women…fatna is extremely beautiful, extremely intelligent, extremely brave (if somewhat unscrupulous). only a man who is her match can win her in the end…she shapes her future life, makes her own fortune…male characters play only secondary, complementary roles. they were there as means for the heroine to fulfill her dreams.

post 688 of an infinity-part series

#also: [sudanese fairy tales] are told to children as bedtime stories or as means of entertainment during the long and dark evenings.    #[just like in the nigerian fairy tale tradition] narrating stories in daytime is strongly discouraged and at times considered taboo.”    #”magic is there for all good (and beautiful) people to make use of…in the lady of the new Island    #magic allows a man to get pregnant instead of his wife when he ate the magic meat prepared to help her get pregnant.”    #”stories can be told in prose or in verse with or without music accompaniment. however audience participation remains crucial and is    #inseparable from the performance of storytelling…audience participation can be indirect (as when stories are tailored to the tastes of the    #audience or to deliver a particular message) but often it takes a more positive form (as when answering quizzes repeating habitual or ritual    #phrases or taking part in the performance by dancing or singing refrains). ultimately the audience becomes the hero the central actor.”    #[sudanese fairy tales] mirror local traditions and draw from local myths legends and histories as well as from scenes of everyday life.”    #”the older members of the community use these tales as ‘social stories’ to indirectly and craftily inject the desired moral values    #according to the conventions of the community or the tribe and to warn (the listeners) against ignoring or breaking them.”    #”[the sudanese fairy tale heroine’s] weapons for survival include her beauty intelligence and resourcefulness. and then there is magic and    #miracles. but above all there is the power of disguise. a woman can beat the world of men by becoming part of it. in these tales the episode    #of the disguise of femininity plays a central part. a certain female disguises herself and passes for a man because she is dressed    #in men’s clothes and behaves in a masculine manner. she then forsakes her seclusion seeks adventures    #achieves wonders competes with men and mostly emulates them.”    #”pre-islamic nubian society in sudan was a matriarchal society while the arab-islamic society which succeeded it [wasn’t]…the grandmother    #continues to play a matriarchal role which bridges these two worlds. she wields undisputed authority over both men and women. through her    #role as a storyteller she also bridges the worlds of fact and fancy and wields a formative influence over culture.” 


1 week ago · 95 notes · originally from caterinasforzas
#fairy tales #fashion #sudan

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in a georgian fairy tale.


examples: მწყემსი და მდიდარი ბავშვი (the shepherd and the child of fortune), მეფის შვილი და ვაშლის (the king’s son and the apple), conkiajgharuna ახალგაზრდა მათხოვარი გოგონა (conkiajgharuna the little rag girl)

bound by russia to the north and northeast, azerbaijan to the east, the black sea to the west, and armenia and turkey to the south, georgia or sakartvelo (the homeland of the kartvelians, which is now how the georgians refer to themselves) is a land of tales [that are] the products of so many different influences…despite the fact that georgia has frequently been invaded by people from outside europe, including arabs, turks, iranians, and mongols, the people have somehow been able to retain their identity. this can be attributed in part to the inaccessibility of the mountainous regions of the county, and in part to the unique georgian language [kartuli] and alphabet…the style of storytelling most frequently employed in both [georgian] fairy tales and shamanic stories is that of magic realism…in georgian fairy tales featuring animals, the most ancient magical objects are horse hair, fur, skin, teeth, wings, feathers, horns, heart, liver, and eggs. also included are objects made from wool (carpets and caps).

post 696 of an infinity-part series

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in a georgian fairy tale.

examples: მწყემსი და მდიდარი ბავშვი (the shepherd and the child of fortune), მეფის შვილი და ვაშლის (the king’s son and the apple), conkiajgharuna ახალგაზრდა მათხოვარი გოგონა (conkiajgharuna the little rag girl)

bound by russia to the north and northeast, azerbaijan to the east, the black sea to the west, and armenia and turkey to the south, georgia or sakartvelo (the homeland of the kartvelians, which is now how the georgians refer to themselves) is a land of tales [that are] the products of so many different influences…despite the fact that georgia has frequently been invaded by people from outside europe, including arabs, turks, iranians, and mongols, the people have somehow been able to retain their identity. this can be attributed in part to the inaccessibility of the mountainous regions of the county, and in part to the unique georgian language [kartuli] and alphabet…the style of storytelling most frequently employed in both [georgian] fairy tales and shamanic stories is that of magic realism…in georgian fairy tales featuring animals, the most ancient magical objects are horse hair, fur, skin, teeth, wings, feathers, horns, heart, liver, and eggs. also included are objects made from wool (carpets and caps).

post 696 of an infinity-part series


1 week ago · 103 notes · originally from caterinasforzas
#fairy tales #fashion #georgia

becdecorbin:

kuchenkat:

pettry:

The prince of the far, far away land wanted to marry the princess, but she rejected him. As a punishment the princess was sent to a lair of a dragon so that it would kill her. But as soon as the dragon and the princess saw each other they fell madly in love and lived happily ever after. The end!

HA HAHA HA HA HAHAHA HA HAHA HA eeheeheeeheee

best fairy tale

becdecorbin:

kuchenkat:

pettry:

The prince of the far, far away land wanted to marry the princess, but she rejected him. As a punishment the princess was sent to a lair of a dragon so that it would kill her. But as soon as the dragon and the princess saw each other they fell madly in love and lived happily ever after. The end!

HA HAHA HA HA HAHAHA HA HAHA HA eeheeheeeheee

best fairy tale

(via fairytaleslive)


1 week ago · 17,349 notes · originally from pettry
#art #dragons #fairy tales

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in a tanzanian fairy tale.

examples: mchawi na mwana wa mfalme (the magician and the sultan’s son), mkaaah jeechonee wawindaji vijana (the boy hunter), shetani katika shamba mchele (the monster in the rice field)

tanzania has a very rich, diverse, and sophisticated [fairy tale tradition]. each ethnic group has [its own fairy tales] that embody culture and tradition and are an important element in tanzanian cultural heritage. storytelling is tremendously important in african societies, serving a far more diverse purpose than simply entertainment. it teaches lessons of religion, morals, history, roles, and societal codes. it builds strong bonds among generations and helps people share experiences and ideas…heroes include ritual specialists, not just political heroes…the chagga, who live on the slopes of mt. kilamanjero tell many stories about the mountain…there is a standard opening formula before a [haya] narrative is told. the audience says, “see so that we may see” before the start of a fairy tale. fairy tales also recount the exploits of tricksters such as hare and tortoise…the basukuma have many stories based on their beliefs on death and sufferings. they believe that fate is determined by shing’wengwe and shishieg’we (ogres and spirits). the ogres are usually shown as being half human, half demon, or as terrible monsters…trickster stories based on animals like hare, spider, chameleon, and squirrel are common in sukumaland…the kaguru trickster rabbit [is featured prominently]. in one tale, hyena and rabbit agree to kill their mothers and sell their flesh in order to survive a famine. while hyena kills his mother, the rabbit repents and hides his mother until the hyena dies of hunger…this tale represents problems of authority between categories of men in a kaguru matrilineal clan. rabbit represent a junior male and hyena a senior. this tale illustrates conflicts and divisions within a matrilineage. those that transgress social boundaries of authority are considered witches just as the hyena is symbolic of a witch.


post 770 of an infinity-part series



#”the tales themselves are entertaining with hare tricksters monsters infanticide    #patricide matricide sororicide and a solomonic pair of baby halves.”    #tanzanian ”women have always been upholders of tradition…it has often been the primary duty of women to pass down traditional wisdom    #cultural mores and value systems to future generations’ through the use of fairy tales…in their songs poetry and tales african women have    #always questioned the traditional cultural expectations for women to be primarily mothers and wives…the three-dimensional image of the    #woman that is found in tanzanian oral literature bears testimony to the values and beliefs of the tanzanians about women since    #as we have explained oral literature springs from and expresses the culture of a people (i.e. their values and beliefs being part of it).    #since the image is entrenched in the minds of the people it follows that it exhibits itself in their compositions and influences the    #audience and further cements their beliefs. it is assumed here that folklore materials have but only one possible interpretation    #which is equally understood and accepted by all members in that society and that what is expressed in folklore finds    #practical application in real life…[fairy tales] are capable of and may be expressions of    #both differences as well as unity conflicts and also solidarity diversity as well as homogeneity.” 

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in a tanzanian fairy tale.

examples: mchawi na mwana wa mfalme (the magician and the sultan’s son), mkaaah jeechonee wawindaji vijana (the boy hunter), shetani katika shamba mchele (the monster in the rice field)

tanzania has a very rich, diverse, and sophisticated [fairy tale tradition]. each ethnic group has [its own fairy tales] that embody culture and tradition and are an important element in tanzanian cultural heritage. storytelling is tremendously important in african societies, serving a far more diverse purpose than simply entertainment. it teaches lessons of religion, morals, history, roles, and societal codes. it builds strong bonds among generations and helps people share experiences and ideas…heroes include ritual specialists, not just political heroes…the chagga, who live on the slopes of mt. kilamanjero tell many stories about the mountain…there is a standard opening formula before a [haya] narrative is told. the audience says, “see so that we may see” before the start of a fairy tale. fairy tales also recount the exploits of tricksters such as hare and tortoise…the basukuma have many stories based on their beliefs on death and sufferings. they believe that fate is determined by shing’wengwe and shishieg’we (ogres and spirits). the ogres are usually shown as being half human, half demon, or as terrible monsters…trickster stories based on animals like hare, spider, chameleon, and squirrel are common in sukumaland…the kaguru trickster rabbit [is featured prominently]. in one tale, hyena and rabbit agree to kill their mothers and sell their flesh in order to survive a famine. while hyena kills his mother, the rabbit repents and hides his mother until the hyena dies of hunger…this tale represents problems of authority between categories of men in a kaguru matrilineal clan. rabbit represent a junior male and hyena a senior. this tale illustrates conflicts and divisions within a matrilineage. those that transgress social boundaries of authority are considered witches just as the hyena is symbolic of a witch.

post 770 of an infinity-part series

#”the tales themselves are entertaining with hare tricksters monsters infanticide    #patricide matricide sororicide and a solomonic pair of baby halves.”    #tanzanian ”women have always been upholders of tradition…it has often been the primary duty of women to pass down traditional wisdom    #cultural mores and value systems to future generations’ through the use of fairy tales…in their songs poetry and tales african women have    #always questioned the traditional cultural expectations for women to be primarily mothers and wives…the three-dimensional image of the    #woman that is found in tanzanian oral literature bears testimony to the values and beliefs of the tanzanians about women since    #as we have explained oral literature springs from and expresses the culture of a people (i.e. their values and beliefs being part of it).    #since the image is entrenched in the minds of the people it follows that it exhibits itself in their compositions and influences the    #audience and further cements their beliefs. it is assumed here that folklore materials have but only one possible interpretation    #which is equally understood and accepted by all members in that society and that what is expressed in folklore finds    #practical application in real life…[fairy tales] are capable of and may be expressions of    #both differences as well as unity conflicts and also solidarity diversity as well as homogeneity.” 


1 week ago · 42 notes · originally from caterinasforzas
#fairy tales #fashion #tanzania

droo216:

once upon a time au →in which the show is dark and gritty and well-acted and well-written with thorough world-building and showrunners who are educated in the source material and it’s magically everything I’ve ever wanted

The Coalition of Queens

Jaimie Alexander as Snow White, Queen of the North
Sophia Myles as Cinderella, The People’s Queen
Annabelle Wallis as Aurora, The Sleeping Beauty
Sophie Turner as Ariel, Princess of Atlantica
Sarah Bolger as Belle, Queen of the South
Indira Varma as Jasmine, Sultana of Agrabah
Q’orianka Kilcher as Pocahontas, Chiefess of Powhatan
Zhang Ziyi as Fa Mulan, Defender of China
Estella Daniels as Tiana, The Frog Princess
Tamsin Egerton as Rapunzel, Princess of Corona
Lily Cole as Merida, Queen of Dun Broch
Emily Rose as Emma Swan, The Lost Princess


1 week ago · 3,839 notes · originally from droo216
#fairy tales #once upon a time

septemberwildflowers:

If you’re having a bad night or are fond of a good fairy tale, here’s a handy-dandy masterpost with film, television, literary and musical adaptations of the more well-known stories, plus more. My apologies if any link is not high quality. Hugs!

Film Adaptations:
B e a u t y   a n d   t h e   B e a s t

Beastly (2011), starring Vanessa Hudgens
Beauty and the Beast (1992)
Beauty and the Beast (1991), starring Paige O’Hara [The Enchanted Christmas] [Belle’s Magical World]
Beauty and the Beast (1987), starring Rebecca De Mornay
Beauty and the Beast (1976), starring George C. Scott
Аленький цветочек, The Scarlet Flower (1952)
La Belle et la Bête (1946), starring Josette Day

C i n d e r e l l a  

A Cinderella Story: Once Upon a Song (2011), starring Lucy Hale
Elle: A Modern Cinderella Tale (2010), starring Ashlee Hewitt
Another Cinderella Story (2008), starring Selena Gomez
Ella Enchanted (2004), starring Anne Hathaway
A Cinderella Story (2004), starring Hillary Duff
Ever After (1998), starring Drew Barrymore
Cinderella (1997), starring Brandy Norwood 
Cinderella (1994)
The Slipper and the Rose (1976), starring Gemma Craven
The Glass Slipper (1955), starring Leslie Caron
Cinderella (1950), starring Ilene Woods [Cinderella II] [Cinderella III]

H a n s e l   a n d   G r e t e l

Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters (2013), starring Gemma Arterton
Hansel and Gretel (1982), starring Nicola Stapleton
Hansel and Gretel (1954), starring Anna Russell 

J a c k   a n d   t h e   B e a n s t a l k

Jack the Giant Slayer (2013), starring Nicholas Hoult
Jack and the Beanstalk (2010), starring Christopher Lloyd
Jack and the Beanstalk: The Real Story (2001), starring Matthew Modine
Beanstalk (1994), starring J.D. Daniels
Jack to Mame no Ki (1974), starring Billie Lou Watt

T h e   L i t t l e   M e r m a i d

Adventures of the Little Mermaid (1991)
The Little Mermaid (1989), starring Jodi Benson [Return to the Sea] [Ariel’s Beginning] 
Anderusen Dowa Ningyo Hime, The Mermaid Princess (1975)
Русалочка, The Little Mermaid (1968)


R a p u n z e l

Tangled (2010), starring Mandy Moore [Tangled Ever After]
Rapunzel (1990), starring Linda Purl

R e d   R i d i n g   H o o d

Red Riding Hood (2011), starring Amanda Seyfried
Hoodwinked! (2006), starring Anne Hathaway [Hoodwinked Too]
Little Red Riding Hood (1995)

S l e e p i n g   B e a u t y

Sleeping Beauty (1987), starring Tahnee Welch
Sleeping Beauty (1959), starring Mary Costa

T h e   S n o w   Q u e e n

Frozen (2013), starring Kristen Bell
The Snow Queen (2012), starring Anna Shurochkina
The Snow Queen (2005), starring Sydney Rae White
Snow Queen (2002), starring Bridget Fonda
The Snow Queen (1995), starring Helen Mirren [The Snow Queen’s Revenge]
Снежная королева, The Snow Queen (1957)

S n o w   W h i t e

Snow White and the Huntsman (2012), starring Kristen Stewart
Mirror Mirror (2012), starring Lily Collins
Grimm’s Snow White (2012), starring Eliza Bennett
Snow White: The Fairest of Them All (2001), starring Kristin Kreuk
Snow White: A Tale of Terror (1997), starring Sigourney Weaver
Snow White (1937), starring Adriana Caselotti


T h u m b e l i n a

Thumbelina (2009)
The Adventures of Tom Thumb and Thumbelina (2002) 
Thumbelina (1994), starring Jodi Benson
Thumbelina (1992)

Television Adaptations:

Once Upon a Time (2012) (x)
Grimm (2011)
The Fairytaler (2004)
Happily Ever After: Fairy Tales for Every Child (1995)
Faerie Tale Theatre (1982) (x)
Shirley Temple’s Storybook (1952)


Other Fairy Tale & Fantasy Films: 

Alice in Wonderland (2010) ● Barbie Films Masterpost ● The Brothers Grimm (2005) ● The Dark Crystal (1982) ● Golden Films ● Inkheart (2008) ● The NeverEnding Story (1984) ● Oz: The Great and Powerful (2013) ● Pan’s Labyrinth (2006) ● Peter Pan (2003) ● Peter Pan (1953) ● The Princess Bride (1987) ● Stardust (2007) ● Tolkien Masterpost ● Tuck Everlasting (2002)


Reading:

Read Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tales online
Read Grimm’s fairy tales online
Hundreds of tales from around the world
Many more online fairytales
Fairytale fanfiction
List of book adaptations (x) (x) (x)


Other Resources: 

Disney Films Masterpost
Studio Ghibli Masterpost

septemberwildflowers:

If you’re having a bad night or are fond of a good fairy tale, here’s a handy-dandy masterpost with film, television, literary and musical adaptations of the more well-known stories, plus more. My apologies if any link is not high quality. Hugs!

Film Adaptations:

B e a u t y   a n d   t h e   B e a s t

C i n d e r e l l a  
H a n s e l   a n d   G r e t e l
J a c k   a n d   t h e   B e a n s t a l k
T h e   L i t t l e   M e r m a i d
R a p u n z e l
R e d   R i d i n g   H o o d
S l e e p i n g   B e a u t y
T h e   S n o w   Q u e e n
S n o w   W h i t e
T h u m b e l i n a
Television Adaptations:
Other Fairy Tale & Fantasy Films: 
Reading:
Other Resources: 

(via droo216)



caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in a latvian fairy tale.

examples: barons un gans (the baron and the shepherd), slinks audēja sieviete (the lazy weaving woman), gigants un pastaris (the giant and pastaris)

a high cultural receptivity toward folklore has long existed in such baltic countries as finland, sweden, and denmark…the latvians did not pursue their folklore interests in isolation…[latvian fairy tales] deal with the entire world experience of rustic life, both on the farm and at sea, ranging from the daily and seasonal round of activities, the human life cycle, to magic and religion. above all, the concern is with ordinary things: a stone, tree, bird, field of grain. the single most recurring theme concerns betrothal and marriage. also found in them, but more rarely, are themes of love and death as well as bitter protest against the hard lot of serfs. the tone is often stoical…having been under german domination for some 600 years, the latvians were a people “without a history” or without what could be called a formal national culture. in [fairy tales,] the latvians found a deep sense of the past, the cultural heritage of many generations…latvians of the nineteenth century, as the lower stratum of a german-ruled society under the tsars of russia, had one overriding desire: to show, with the aid of folklore, that the latvians were not merely a substratum of germanic culture, while at the same time denying cultural contact with the russians. for these purposes, fairy tales were ideal. a distinct culture, uniquely latvian, was seen in the products of these peasant folk, demonstrating to the world the worth of the latvian intellect and, therefore, the right of latvians to exist as independent people. as in finland, estonia, and elsewhere, [fairy tales] served to create national consciousness and pride, providing the mainspring for a latvian movement toward independence.

post 698 of an infinity-part series


#also: ”many latvian fairy stories tell about the strong lāčplēsis wo was born and raised on the shore of the daugava. lāčplēsis’ mother was    #a bear and he inherited her bear ears which gave him extraordinary powers. lāčplēsis performed many heroic tasks. he cleansed the shores of    #the daugava of monsters and wizards. in his last fight his opponent cut off one of his ears. lāčplēsis and his opponent fell into the depths    #of the river. according to legend he battle continues under the water. when lāčplēsis finally defeats    #the black knight the latvian people will regain their freedom.”    #”in the mid-nineteenth century as the latvian nation was taking shape the idea of composing a national [fairy tale tradition] became an    #important cultural issue. it was an attempt to master the forms of western culture and at the same time to express national characteristics    #through art…this work has always possessed a dual edge: both artistic and ideological…this increased interest in folklore and its    #integration into literature [functioned as] a source of common values for the nation…their ideas about folklore were not formed through    #systematic study but from childhood learning about other cultures…the actual work of collecting latvian folklore material yielded quite    #unexpected results. the main treasure of latvian folklore was discovered to be a lyrical and at the same time philosophical mantra-like    #quatrain…the [daugava] river played a key role in winning independence for the latvian nation [and is featured in many fairy tales]…    #the theme of castles sunk in lakes is quite common in latvian fairy tales. national romantics used this image as a symbol of past glory.” 

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in a latvian fairy tale.

examples: barons un gans (the baron and the shepherd), slinks audēja sieviete (the lazy weaving woman), gigants un pastaris (the giant and pastaris)

a high cultural receptivity toward folklore has long existed in such baltic countries as finland, sweden, and denmark…the latvians did not pursue their folklore interests in isolation…[latvian fairy tales] deal with the entire world experience of rustic life, both on the farm and at sea, ranging from the daily and seasonal round of activities, the human life cycle, to magic and religion. above all, the concern is with ordinary things: a stone, tree, bird, field of grain. the single most recurring theme concerns betrothal and marriage. also found in them, but more rarely, are themes of love and death as well as bitter protest against the hard lot of serfs. the tone is often stoical…having been under german domination for some 600 years, the latvians were a people “without a history” or without what could be called a formal national culture. in [fairy tales,] the latvians found a deep sense of the past, the cultural heritage of many generations…latvians of the nineteenth century, as the lower stratum of a german-ruled society under the tsars of russia, had one overriding desire: to show, with the aid of folklore, that the latvians were not merely a substratum of germanic culture, while at the same time denying cultural contact with the russians. for these purposes, fairy tales were ideal. a distinct culture, uniquely latvian, was seen in the products of these peasant folk, demonstrating to the world the worth of the latvian intellect and, therefore, the right of latvians to exist as independent people. as in finland, estonia, and elsewhere, [fairy tales] served to create national consciousness and pride, providing the mainspring for a latvian movement toward independence.

post 698 of an infinity-part series

#also: ”many latvian fairy stories tell about the strong lāčplēsis wo was born and raised on the shore of the daugava. lāčplēsis’ mother was    #a bear and he inherited her bear ears which gave him extraordinary powers. lāčplēsis performed many heroic tasks. he cleansed the shores of    #the daugava of monsters and wizards. in his last fight his opponent cut off one of his ears. lāčplēsis and his opponent fell into the depths    #of the river. according to legend he battle continues under the water. when lāčplēsis finally defeats    #the black knight the latvian people will regain their freedom.”    #”in the mid-nineteenth century as the latvian nation was taking shape the idea of composing a national [fairy tale tradition] became an    #important cultural issue. it was an attempt to master the forms of western culture and at the same time to express national characteristics    #through art…this work has always possessed a dual edge: both artistic and ideological…this increased interest in folklore and its    #integration into literature [functioned as] a source of common values for the nation…their ideas about folklore were not formed through    #systematic study but from childhood learning about other cultures…the actual work of collecting latvian folklore material yielded quite    #unexpected results. the main treasure of latvian folklore was discovered to be a lyrical and at the same time philosophical mantra-like    #quatrain…the [daugava] river played a key role in winning independence for the latvian nation [and is featured in many fairy tales]…    #the theme of castles sunk in lakes is quite common in latvian fairy tales. national romantics used this image as a symbol of past glory.” 


1 week ago · 40 notes · originally from caterinasforzas
#fairy tales #fashion #latvia

Art from Studio Ghibli’s upcoming movie, Kaguya Hime No Monogatari (x)

(Source: lotusinthefire, via fairytalemood)



caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in a hawaiian fairy tale.
examples: umiumi uliuli (a bluebeard variant), kamali’i wahine kahalaopuna ka manoa (princess kahalaopuna of manoa), punia ka keiki a lawaiʻa and ka manō mōʻī (punia the fisherman’s son and the king of sharks)

women [in hawaiian fairy tales] were not casualties of their own curiosity, like eve, pandora, and psyche…[western fairy tales] differ very highly from traditional hawaiian mo’olelo and ka’ao [because they are] not specifically tied to a certain place, as most, if not all, hawaiian stories are. for example, hawaiians had highly specific names for different aspects of the natural world, and these often came into play in hawaiian stories…heroes of hawaiian stories and legends almost never work alone [but rather with their makamaka. wives, mothers, godmothers, and grandmothers of heroes are frequently given credit.]. even accounts of historical figures often emphasize that they did not toil alone…[when describing women’s actions, western fairy tales use] phrases and words like “pressed by her curiosity,” “temptation,” and “impatience.” in the hawaiian, phrases and words such as “e kaunui ana kona manao e ike i na mea oloko o ka lumi” (“her thoughts were greatly set upon seeing what was in the room”) and “makemake loa” (“greatly desired or wanted”) are used. there is much more intentionality and agency in the hawaiian story…hawaiians were not operating from traditional systems of knowledge alone, and yet they were not colonized by other systems of knowledge either: they were hawaiianizing the concepts presented in such stories.

post 715 of an infinity-part series



#also: ”hawaiian stories are roughly divided into only two types: mo’olelo and ka’ao but there is a lot of overlap between the two…    #some scholars have equated ka’ao to fiction and foreign stories and mo’olelo to non-fiction and hawaiian stories.”    #at a time when women were at best helpmates in most western contexts many hawaiian texts were emphasizing the important    #public role that ali’i or chiefly (meaning noble rank) women played. thus portrayals of femininity and its powers or women were quite    #different from those in foundational western stories…[when bluebeard was transmitted to hawaii changed were made] to make    #it more of a hawaiian story meaning it can be considered an assimilative or domesticating translation as opposed to a    #foreignizing one. this was a reversal of the normal direction of colonial translation as it was normally the exotic native stories that    #were translated to fit the dominant mode of understanding rather than the other way around…    #the events of umiumi uliuli have been changed to fit the hawaiian context into which it was placed.”    #umiumi uliuli differed from traditional stories [in] that there was no indication of any type of mo’okü’auhau (genealogy) to open the story.    #hawaiian stories besides situating themselves in space with specific geographical references often situated themselves in time and in    #familial space by opening with a genealogy of the main characters of the story.    #family position or relationship often dictated or explained certain actions within the story.”    #”in the hawaiian version the key has mana [and] having mana elevates the status of the key much higher than that of a mere magical object.    #an object that has mana is worthy of respect in and of itself not just because umi’umi uliuli uses it.”    #” the blood on the key has been read by many western scholars as having a sexual connotation with some seeing this blood as a sign of the    #wife’s sexual indiscretion or betrayal and some seeing it as a loss of innocence or virginity…though traditional hawaiian mo’olelo and    #ka’ao are chock-full of sexual innuendo sexual liaisons and sometimes even superhuman sexual endurance blood is not often a symbol in the    #stories that is associated with these activities. blood was seen as defiling in traditional hawaiian belief but it was not necessarily    #related to women’s sexuality. the blood of a man or a woman would have the same polluting effect…thus it is not likely that hawaiians    #would have seen the blood as an implication of the wife’s pollution or awakening/wanton sexuality    #but as an indication that the key had been defiled and was bereft of mana.” 

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in a hawaiian fairy tale.

examples: umiumi uliuli (a bluebeard variant), kamali’i wahine kahalaopuna ka manoa (princess kahalaopuna of manoa), punia ka keiki a lawaiʻa and ka manō mōʻī (punia the fisherman’s son and the king of sharks)

women [in hawaiian fairy tales] were not casualties of their own curiosity, like eve, pandora, and psyche…[western fairy tales] differ very highly from traditional hawaiian mo’olelo and ka’ao [because they are] not specifically tied to a certain place, as most, if not all, hawaiian stories are. for example, hawaiians had highly specific names for different aspects of the natural world, and these often came into play in hawaiian stories…heroes of hawaiian stories and legends almost never work alone [but rather with their makamaka. wives, mothers, godmothers, and grandmothers of heroes are frequently given credit.]. even accounts of historical figures often emphasize that they did not toil alone…[when describing women’s actions, western fairy tales use] phrases and words like “pressed by her curiosity,” “temptation,” and “impatience.” in the hawaiian, phrases and words such as “e kaunui ana kona manao e ike i na mea oloko o ka lumi” (“her thoughts were greatly set upon seeing what was in the room”) and “makemake loa” (“greatly desired or wanted”) are used. there is much more intentionality and agency in the hawaiian story…hawaiians were not operating from traditional systems of knowledge alone, and yet they were not colonized by other systems of knowledge either: they were hawaiianizing the concepts presented in such stories.

post 715 of an infinity-part series

#also: ”hawaiian stories are roughly divided into only two types: mo’olelo and ka’ao but there is a lot of overlap between the two…    #some scholars have equated ka’ao to fiction and foreign stories and mo’olelo to non-fiction and hawaiian stories.”    #at a time when women were at best helpmates in most western contexts many hawaiian texts were emphasizing the important    #public role that ali’i or chiefly (meaning noble rank) women played. thus portrayals of femininity and its powers or women were quite    #different from those in foundational western stories…[when bluebeard was transmitted to hawaii changed were made] to make    #it more of a hawaiian story meaning it can be considered an assimilative or domesticating translation as opposed to a    #foreignizing one. this was a reversal of the normal direction of colonial translation as it was normally the exotic native stories that    #were translated to fit the dominant mode of understanding rather than the other way around…    #the events of umiumi uliuli have been changed to fit the hawaiian context into which it was placed.”    #umiumi uliuli differed from traditional stories [in] that there was no indication of any type of mo’okü’auhau (genealogy) to open the story.    #hawaiian stories besides situating themselves in space with specific geographical references often situated themselves in time and in    #familial space by opening with a genealogy of the main characters of the story.    #family position or relationship often dictated or explained certain actions within the story.”    #”in the hawaiian version the key has mana [and] having mana elevates the status of the key much higher than that of a mere magical object.    #an object that has mana is worthy of respect in and of itself not just because umi’umi uliuli uses it.”    #” the blood on the key has been read by many western scholars as having a sexual connotation with some seeing this blood as a sign of the    #wife’s sexual indiscretion or betrayal and some seeing it as a loss of innocence or virginity…though traditional hawaiian mo’olelo and    #ka’ao are chock-full of sexual innuendo sexual liaisons and sometimes even superhuman sexual endurance blood is not often a symbol in the    #stories that is associated with these activities. blood was seen as defiling in traditional hawaiian belief but it was not necessarily    #related to women’s sexuality. the blood of a man or a woman would have the same polluting effect…thus it is not likely that hawaiians    #would have seen the blood as an implication of the wife’s pollution or awakening/wanton sexuality    #but as an indication that the key had been defiled and was bereft of mana.” 


2 weeks ago · 75 notes · originally from caterinasforzas
#fairy tales #fashion #hawaii

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in a hungarian fairy tale.


examples: a kérők hercegnő szentjánosbogár (the suitors of princess firefly), a férfi az arany szakáll (the gold-bearded man), uletka és a fehér gyík (uletka and the white lizard)

[the hungarian fairy tales tradition] is richly based in the national character. it mirrors the many-sided texture of the hungarian peasant imagination: its simple belief in the supernatural, its faith in the power of good and evil, and its ability to use the splendid release of humor to make the business of ordinary daily life bearable…the villains are certainly villainous, yet their badness is human and recognizable so that one can retain some small shred of sympathy for them; the heroes are heroic without bombast, because their basic goodness is not of the shining armor type: they, too, are a little too human for that.



post 704 of an infinity-part series



#also: ”a major premise in [hungarian fairy tales] is that tales do not lie. some of the magnificent tales end with a story within a story:    #after many dangerous adventures a woman (like fairy ilona) returns home incognito disguising her identity because she has been wrongly    #accused of crimes. a storytelling session begins and the woman is invited to tell a tale: in the guise of fiction she presents her own true    #story. in growing astonishment the listeners slowly recognize that this ‘made-up’ story is real…the long-suffering heroine is rewarded.”    #hungarian fairy ”tales are characterized by the famous székely deadpan humor…they built their own communities and interacted with    #other [exiles]…isolated from their homelands expatriates of borrowing from each other and creating new forms of folkloric expression    #resulting from new experiences in the multilingual multiethnic bucovina. the bucovina székelys’ exposure to cultural diversity    #for more than two centuries is largely responsible for the richness and peculiarities” of their fairy tales.    #”humorous tales according to gyula ortutay may contain elements of magic but are more robust and realistic than fairy tales. in addition    #ortutay gives humorous tales the characteristic of lashing out with rather unsparing humor at the stumblings of the weak…these jokes were    #born or became rooted in the tradition of people having a hard often barely tolerable fate. thus in humorous tales the reigning element    #is not the miraculous but the grotesque…the heroes of these fairy tales if not an animal are all human males    #[which] points to patriarchal roots of the hungarian culture. similarly child protagonists do not exist.”    #”characteristics of form [of hungarian fairy tales are] their colorfulness and perpetual power…[hungarian fairy tales] incorporate    #the social aspirations the self-esteem of the people and seeking justice and vengeance.”    #”public storytelling was a major event [in traditional hungarian death rituals at wakes];    #the narrator’s task was the keep all the mourners respectfully awake from dusk til next morning’s dawn.”    #hungarian fairy tales ”have a more hidden musical layer [that] frequently represents a central part of it…hungarian musical tales are    #tales in which the plot is conveyed to the listeners by the performer both singing and in prose alternating the two. singing and speech    #alternate freely and it also happens on occasion that singing represents quotation…it excellently describes the state of mind of the    #characters. it virtually paints a picture of the plot…the irrational extratraterrestrial musical elements of the fairy tales are always    #functionally bound and the expressions related to them are essentially identical stereotypes. functional definition here means that the    #musical instrument or music in the broader sense appears as a magical instrument in the tales.”    #”bands with a large apparatus were fashionable. the large apparatus always meant 5-6 players or 10-12 players…the pattern was provided by    #the bands playing for nobility. it is only natural that the royal feasts figuring at the ends of tales deserved an appropriate ensemble.”  

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in a hungarian fairy tale.

examples: a kérők hercegnő szentjánosbogár (the suitors of princess firefly), a férfi az arany szakáll (the gold-bearded man), uletka és a fehér gyík (uletka and the white lizard)

[the hungarian fairy tales tradition] is richly based in the national character. it mirrors the many-sided texture of the hungarian peasant imagination: its simple belief in the supernatural, its faith in the power of good and evil, and its ability to use the splendid release of humor to make the business of ordinary daily life bearable…the villains are certainly villainous, yet their badness is human and recognizable so that one can retain some small shred of sympathy for them; the heroes are heroic without bombast, because their basic goodness is not of the shining armor type: they, too, are a little too human for that.

post 704 of an infinity-part series

#also: ”a major premise in [hungarian fairy tales] is that tales do not lie. some of the magnificent tales end with a story within a story:    #after many dangerous adventures a woman (like fairy ilona) returns home incognito disguising her identity because she has been wrongly    #accused of crimes. a storytelling session begins and the woman is invited to tell a tale: in the guise of fiction she presents her own true    #story. in growing astonishment the listeners slowly recognize that this ‘made-up’ story is real…the long-suffering heroine is rewarded.”    #hungarian fairy ”tales are characterized by the famous székely deadpan humor…they built their own communities and interacted with    #other [exiles]…isolated from their homelands expatriates of borrowing from each other and creating new forms of folkloric expression    #resulting from new experiences in the multilingual multiethnic bucovina. the bucovina székelys’ exposure to cultural diversity    #for more than two centuries is largely responsible for the richness and peculiarities” of their fairy tales.    #”humorous tales according to gyula ortutay may contain elements of magic but are more robust and realistic than fairy tales. in addition    #ortutay gives humorous tales the characteristic of lashing out with rather unsparing humor at the stumblings of the weak…these jokes were    #born or became rooted in the tradition of people having a hard often barely tolerable fate. thus in humorous tales the reigning element    #is not the miraculous but the grotesque…the heroes of these fairy tales if not an animal are all human males    #[which] points to patriarchal roots of the hungarian culture. similarly child protagonists do not exist.”    #”characteristics of form [of hungarian fairy tales are] their colorfulness and perpetual power…[hungarian fairy tales] incorporate    #the social aspirations the self-esteem of the people and seeking justice and vengeance.”    #”public storytelling was a major event [in traditional hungarian death rituals at wakes];    #the narrator’s task was the keep all the mourners respectfully awake from dusk til next morning’s dawn.”    #hungarian fairy tales ”have a more hidden musical layer [that] frequently represents a central part of it…hungarian musical tales are    #tales in which the plot is conveyed to the listeners by the performer both singing and in prose alternating the two. singing and speech    #alternate freely and it also happens on occasion that singing represents quotation…it excellently describes the state of mind of the    #characters. it virtually paints a picture of the plot…the irrational extratraterrestrial musical elements of the fairy tales are always    #functionally bound and the expressions related to them are essentially identical stereotypes. functional definition here means that the    #musical instrument or music in the broader sense appears as a magical instrument in the tales.”    #”bands with a large apparatus were fashionable. the large apparatus always meant 5-6 players or 10-12 players…the pattern was provided by    #the bands playing for nobility. it is only natural that the royal feasts figuring at the ends of tales deserved an appropriate ensemble.”  


2 weeks ago · 49 notes · originally from caterinasforzas
#fairy tales #fashion #hungary

Favourite Editorials | Little Boy & Girl Lost

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