a lot of love,
a lot of blood




"On the whole I am inclined to think that a witch should not kiss. Perhaps it is the not being kissed that makes her a witch; perhaps the source of her power is the breath of loneliness around her." - Emma Donoghue

S., 24, Italian. Kate is my internet handle and you can call me that. People scare me so I'll probably never talk to you even if I think you're cool, and if I do it'll be very awkward. English is my second language; I apologize for any mistakes.

I love a lot of things, including fairy tales, mythology, ladies who make music, ladies in general, history, languages. I watch a lot of movies and tv, I ship all the things, and I love Pokémon a lot.
 



anthonyedwardstarks:

This is Berk. It snows nine months of the year, and hails the other three. Any food that grows here is tough and tasteless. The people that grow here are even more so. The only upsides are the pets. While other places have ponies or parrots… we have… dragons.

(via asheathes)




Just making sure that you’re real.

Just making sure that you’re real.


2 days ago · 616 notes · originally from geizlieb
#electrick children #movies

"If the world is divided into seeing and not seeing, Marya thought, I shall always choose to see."

— Catherynne M. Valente, Deathless (via little-corner-of-the-world)

(via renaissancemadonna)




mythology meme:  [4/8] myths, legends, and stories
↳ popocatépetl and iztaccíhuatl

The best-known version of the origin myth of the two volcanoes is the oral tradition of the Náhuas, a story of love between a warrior and a princess. Because it’s an oral tradition, there are many different versions, but they all tell a similar tale.
The chief of the Aztecs was loved by all, but a heavy burden was on his heart: he had no children and therefore no natural successors to his throne. One day, however, his wife announced that they were going to have a child, and so it was: the baby girl was beautiful and she was named Iztaccíhuatl (‘white lady’). As she grew, Iztaccíhuatl fell in love with a chief of a tribe, whose name was Popocatépetl (‘the Smoking Mountain’). However, war broke out, and the Emperor told Popacatépetl to bring back the enemy chief’s head and prove himself a worthy husband to the princess. Popocatépetl obeyed and the war raged on for months. 
When finally the announcement of victory came, it was with a tinge of sadness: Popocatépetl was said to have died in battle. Iztaccíhuatl heard the news and became so sad she couldn’t eat or sleep and a few days later she fell ill and died. While the Emperor was preparing to bury his only daughter, Popocatépetl and his warriors returned, victorious. The Emperor was shocked, but there was nothing to be done, and he told Popocatépetl of Iztaccíhuatl’s death. Popocatépetl was devastated: he took her dead form in his arms and left town. He walked for a very long time until he finally reached low mountains, where he told his companions to prepare a funeral table with many flowers and he laid his love down on it. After, he knelt over the table and guarded over her until he died of sadness. The gods were moved by Popocatépetl’s love for Iztaccíhuatl, and they turned the bodies of the dead lovers into great volcanoes. The larger of the two, Popocatépetl, still spits out smoke every now and then to show he’s still keeping watch over Iztaccíhuatl. 

mythology meme:  [4/8] myths, legends, and stories

↳ popocatépetl and iztaccíhuatl

The best-known version of the origin myth of the two volcanoes is the oral tradition of the Náhuas, a story of love between a warrior and a princess. Because it’s an oral tradition, there are many different versions, but they all tell a similar tale.

The chief of the Aztecs was loved by all, but a heavy burden was on his heart: he had no children and therefore no natural successors to his throne. One day, however, his wife announced that they were going to have a child, and so it was: the baby girl was beautiful and she was named Iztaccíhuatl (‘white lady’). As she grew, Iztaccíhuatl fell in love with a chief of a tribe, whose name was Popocatépetl (‘the Smoking Mountain’). However, war broke out, and the Emperor told Popacatépetl to bring back the enemy chief’s head and prove himself a worthy husband to the princess. Popocatépetl obeyed and the war raged on for months.

When finally the announcement of victory came, it was with a tinge of sadness: Popocatépetl was said to have died in battle. Iztaccíhuatl heard the news and became so sad she couldn’t eat or sleep and a few days later she fell ill and died. While the Emperor was preparing to bury his only daughter, Popocatépetl and his warriors returned, victorious. The Emperor was shocked, but there was nothing to be done, and he told Popocatépetl of Iztaccíhuatl’s death. Popocatépetl was devastated: he took her dead form in his arms and left town. He walked for a very long time until he finally reached low mountains, where he told his companions to prepare a funeral table with many flowers and he laid his love down on it. After, he knelt over the table and guarded over her until he died of sadness. The gods were moved by Popocatépetl’s love for Iztaccíhuatl, and they turned the bodies of the dead lovers into great volcanoes. The larger of the two, Popocatépetl, still spits out smoke every now and then to show he’s still keeping watch over Iztaccíhuatl. 



I had  w i n g s once, and they were  s t r o n g. They could carry me above the clouds and into the headwinds, and they never faltered. Not even once. But they were stolen from me.

(Source: selenanbieber, via asheathes)


2 days ago · 14,583 notes · originally from selenanbieber
#maleficent #movies #fairy tales #sleeping beauty

Anonymous whispered, "A little baby elephant stumbles into your askbox, holding a small letter in his mouth. He hands the note to you, “I love you. You are a wonderful, loved person." Pass it on to the first ten people on your dash anonymously"

Aw, thank you!


2 days ago · 1 note
#asks

tealeaves:

amq:

hellanne: (by Javier Andrés)

(via droo216)


2 days ago · 6,040 notes · originally from hellanne
#photography

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in a syrian fairy tale.




examples: قصة الملكة المتسول (the story of the beggar queen), ابن سينا ​​والطاعون الماوس في حلب (avicenna and the mouse plague at aleppo), قصة التاجر (the story of the merchant of khan alwazir)

the most popular types of syrian story structures [are] the gissa (story), the hikaya (tale), and the hudutha (episode).
their purpose on the most explicit level is didactic - that is, to teach lessons in morality and social values or simply to inform about the ways of the world. the stories are presented as serious narratives that are true enough to life so that they might have happened without resort to miraculous or superhuman intervention. in general, this approach means that the actors are human, or, if animals are the main characters, that they behave in a way consistent with reality; that is, they don’t talk or otherwise behave as human beings.
علاء الدين (aladdin), like علي بابا والأربعون لصا (ali baba and the forty thieves), is actually a french-syrian creation from the beginning of the eighteenth century.
a number of conventions and formulae are found in the narratives. many are based on the didactic device of repetition…a common device in arabic, as in english, is to present a point in three repetitious actions…some of the tales appeared in rhyming verse.[syrian fairy tales] differ from the usual arabic literary tradition. in general, arabic prefers an elaborate, embellished plot, replete with florid descriptive passages. but instead, the narratives appearing here are usually composed in a spare, restrained style that outlines only the critical elements of the plot…detail is used only when the plot requires elaboration of a point to make a conclusion more plausible.


post 862 of an infinity-part series






#”commonly occurring formulae are found at the beginning and end of stories…’kan ya makan fi qadim al-ziman’ are words as familiar to a    #syrian child as the words ‘once upon a time’ are to an american child. the two phrases are laden with the magic of anticipation for a story    #as yet unheard or with the delight of recognition in retold tales…the tale also has its consistent ending: aya aya antahat al-hidaya bi    #sha’a am halawiya.’ literally this phrase translates ‘aya aya (nonsense words) thus ends the tale was it disgusting or entertaining?’    #”the storytellers called hakawati knew by heart the basic elements of the long epics…though the origins of the epics are not completely    #clear they most probably began as descriptive stories and only later developed more complicated plots and sometimes even stable rhyming    #versions. although the true events upon which they were based could have been related in the period of half an hour the hakawati could    #elaborate them with embellishments into a thousand hours. in the process the storyteller would draw upon as much of the popular local    #knowledge and wisdom as he could to make the occurrences more appealing and relevant to his audience. because the stories were    #conveyed from mouth to mouth and not written down until later early storytellers had a great deal of leeway in how they related the major    #episodes…it was customary alsofor the listeners to bribe the storyteller to change the details of the episode to favor their own side…    #some of these storytellers would come to be thought of as possessing a special wisdom (hikma or fahm) and people would consult them when    #they needed advice…stories like popular aphorisms do not need to be mutually consistent. each depends for its impact on the context    #in which it is told and the receptivity of its audience to a specific message at the time of its telling…a clue to the origin of some of    #the stories lies in allusions to identifiably christian or muslim themes…syrians as a people are generally tolerant of different religious    #groups and it is unlikely that people generate certain themes to promote their religious beliefs. instead those who first tell the stories    #tend to use the symbols and details with which they are most familiar…[there are certain] details that a syrian might use as markers.    #normally christian stories would not mention divorce polygamy or revenge conflicts. they would be more likely to mention priests and holy    #symbols such as crosses and churches. muslim stories tend to be peopled with sheikhs and bedouin and fateful incidents may occur that    #are not a direct consequence of the actions of the characters as seen for example in قصة اللص القديسين (the story of the saintly thief)…a    #character’s occupation is one important way of identifying religious origin since the different religious communities in the past tended to    #monopolize certain of the trades…the second form of narrative is the tale (hikaya) which is generally a non-serious humorous entertainment    #sometimes appearing in rhyming verse and designed for young children…the third form of narrative (hadutha) [is] called an episode to    #distinguish it from the stories and tales…it can usually be classified as a non-serious narrative.”   

caterinasforzas:

what to wear when…in a syrian fairy tale.

examples: قصة الملكة المتسول (the story of the beggar queen), ابن سينا ​​والطاعون الماوس في حلب (avicenna and the mouse plague at aleppo), قصة التاجر (the story of the merchant of khan alwazir)

the most popular types of syrian story structures [are] the gissa (story), the hikaya (tale), and the hudutha (episode).

their purpose on the most explicit level is didactic - that is, to teach lessons in morality and social values or simply to inform about the ways of the world. the stories are presented as serious narratives that are true enough to life so that they might have happened without resort to miraculous or superhuman intervention. in general, this approach means that the actors are human, or, if animals are the main characters, that they behave in a way consistent with reality; that is, they don’t talk or otherwise behave as human beings.

علاء الدين (aladdin), like علي بابا والأربعون لصا (ali baba and the forty thieves), is actually a french-syrian creation from the beginning of the eighteenth century.

a number of conventions and formulae are found in the narratives. many are based on the didactic device of repetition…a common device in arabic, as in english, is to present a point in three repetitious actions…some of the tales appeared in rhyming verse.

[syrian fairy tales] differ from the usual arabic literary tradition. in general, arabic prefers an elaborate, embellished plot, replete with florid descriptive passages. but instead, the narratives appearing here are usually composed in a spare, restrained style that outlines only the critical elements of the plot…detail is used only when the plot requires elaboration of a point to make a conclusion more plausible.

post 862 of an infinity-part series

#”commonly occurring formulae are found at the beginning and end of stories…’kan ya makan fi qadim al-ziman’ are words as familiar to a    #syrian child as the words ‘once upon a time’ are to an american child. the two phrases are laden with the magic of anticipation for a story    #as yet unheard or with the delight of recognition in retold tales…the tale also has its consistent ending: aya aya antahat al-hidaya bi    #sha’a am halawiya.’ literally this phrase translates ‘aya aya (nonsense words) thus ends the tale was it disgusting or entertaining?’    #”the storytellers called hakawati knew by heart the basic elements of the long epics…though the origins of the epics are not completely    #clear they most probably began as descriptive stories and only later developed more complicated plots and sometimes even stable rhyming    #versions. although the true events upon which they were based could have been related in the period of half an hour the hakawati could    #elaborate them with embellishments into a thousand hours. in the process the storyteller would draw upon as much of the popular local    #knowledge and wisdom as he could to make the occurrences more appealing and relevant to his audience. because the stories were    #conveyed from mouth to mouth and not written down until later early storytellers had a great deal of leeway in how they related the major    #episodes…it was customary alsofor the listeners to bribe the storyteller to change the details of the episode to favor their own side…    #some of these storytellers would come to be thought of as possessing a special wisdom (hikma or fahm) and people would consult them when    #they needed advice…stories like popular aphorisms do not need to be mutually consistent. each depends for its impact on the context    #in which it is told and the receptivity of its audience to a specific message at the time of its telling…a clue to the origin of some of    #the stories lies in allusions to identifiably christian or muslim themes…syrians as a people are generally tolerant of different religious    #groups and it is unlikely that people generate certain themes to promote their religious beliefs. instead those who first tell the stories    #tend to use the symbols and details with which they are most familiar…[there are certain] details that a syrian might use as markers.    #normally christian stories would not mention divorce polygamy or revenge conflicts. they would be more likely to mention priests and holy    #symbols such as crosses and churches. muslim stories tend to be peopled with sheikhs and bedouin and fateful incidents may occur that    #are not a direct consequence of the actions of the characters as seen for example in قصة اللص القديسين (the story of the saintly thief)…a    #character’s occupation is one important way of identifying religious origin since the different religious communities in the past tended to    #monopolize certain of the trades…the second form of narrative is the tale (hikaya) which is generally a non-serious humorous entertainment    #sometimes appearing in rhyming verse and designed for young children…the third form of narrative (hadutha) [is] called an episode to    #distinguish it from the stories and tales…it can usually be classified as a non-serious narrative.”   


2 days ago · 40 notes · originally from caterinasforzas
#fairy tales #fashion #syria

We’ll live by the sea.


2 days ago · 568 notes · originally from pinkmanwhite
#electrick children #movies


mythology meme:  [3/8] myths, legends, and stories
↳ the kidnapping of iðunn

This particular story is from the Prose Edda; more specifically, it’s found in the book Skáldskaparmál (‘language of poetry’), which is presented in the form of a dialogue between Ægir, a sea giant, and Bragi, the god of poetry.
One day, Loki the trickster is trying to chase a large eagle away with a pole, but after whacking it, he gets stuck to the bird and is carried higher and higher into the sky. Loki begs the eagle, who is actually the ice giant Þjazi in disguise, to release him. Þjazi does so, on the condition that Loki will lure Iðunn, the goddess of youth, out of the gates of Asgard so that Þjazi can kidnap her. Loki agrees and later fulfils his promise by telling Iðunn that there are interesting apples in a certain forest, and that she should want to bring her own with to compare. Intrigued, Iðunn goes with him, and eagle-shaped Þjazi snatches the goddess between his claws and flies away.
The Æsir start to wither and grow old without Iðunn’s youth apples and they figure Loki has something to do with her disappearance. The Æsir tell him he has to bring her back, or there’ll be dire consequences. Loki gets Freyja to lend him her ‘falcon shape’, and off he goes. He finds Iðunn and turns her into a nut to carry her back home. However, Þjazi notices his prisoner has gone missing, and chases the disguised Loki. The Æsir notice the two birds coming from afar and they build a large fire by the walls of Asgard; the falcon manages to evade the fire, but the eagle is unable to stop and flies straight into the flames. 

mythology meme:  [3/8] myths, legends, and stories

↳ the kidnapping of iðunn

This particular story is from the Prose Edda; more specifically, it’s found in the book Skáldskaparmál (‘language of poetry’), which is presented in the form of a dialogue between Ægir, a sea giant, and Bragi, the god of poetry.

One day, Loki the trickster is trying to chase a large eagle away with a pole, but after whacking it, he gets stuck to the bird and is carried higher and higher into the sky. Loki begs the eagle, who is actually the ice giant Þjazi in disguise, to release him. Þjazi does so, on the condition that Loki will lure Iðunn, the goddess of youth, out of the gates of Asgard so that Þjazi can kidnap her. Loki agrees and later fulfils his promise by telling Iðunn that there are interesting apples in a certain forest, and that she should want to bring her own with to compare. Intrigued, Iðunn goes with him, and eagle-shaped Þjazi snatches the goddess between his claws and flies away.

The Æsir start to wither and grow old without Iðunn’s youth apples and they figure Loki has something to do with her disappearance. The Æsir tell him he has to bring her back, or there’ll be dire consequences. Loki gets Freyja to lend him her ‘falcon shape’, and off he goes. He finds Iðunn and turns her into a nut to carry her back home. However, Þjazi notices his prisoner has gone missing, and chases the disguised Loki. The Æsir notice the two birds coming from afar and they build a large fire by the walls of Asgard; the falcon manages to evade the fire, but the eagle is unable to stop and flies straight into the flames. 


2 days ago · 510 notes · originally from charlesmmacaulay
#mythology #iðunn

I am not asking you to understand or forgive my actions, but for the first time in my life I was happy. We thought we could have it all. We were naive.

(via naokosattomi)


2 days ago · 1,907 notes · originally from naokosattomi
#a royal affair #movies

Electrick Chidlren » Requested by Anon.

3 days ago · 721 notes · originally from ghouliiest
#electrick children #movies

phi-yen:

Inspired by my matryoshka dolls and red riding hood, this happened haha. I forgot how to delete backgrounds so… sorry gaiz.

phi-yen:

Inspired by my matryoshka dolls and red riding hood, this happened haha. I forgot how to delete backgrounds so… sorry gaiz.

(via maideninthetower)


3 days ago · 247 notes · originally from phi-yen
#red riding hood #fairy tales #art

"When her kiss transforms the Beast, she is furious.

"You should have warned me! Here I was smitten by an exceptional being, and all of a sudden, my fiance becomes an ordinary distinguished young man!""

the 1909 play Beauty and the Beast:  Fantasy in Two Acts by Fernand Noziere, the very first published version of the story where the Beauty is disappointed when the Beast transforms into a human at the end.

(Source: corseque, via okayophelia)



She’s had an immaculate conception. She’s carrying the son of God, that little fucker.

3 days ago · 370 notes · originally from rudesteiners
#electrick children #movies